Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
snedders

Scottish bank notes questioned

Recommended Posts

I'm sure its something like they are legal currency but not legal tender. Whenever I'm down in England shops always do look strangely at them but have never been refused. For things lime lfcc I would usually either use a cash machine in town that I know gives English notes or go into bank.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lived in Northern Ireland for 8 years and always had the same problem when I visited England. We are so used to just dealing with the same old English currency. I've always dealt with it by pointing out that it says "sterling" meaning that it's legal in English and people have half nodded and accepted it. The currency is pound sterling after all.

 

They can be forgiven if they've never seen that kind of money before they can think you are having a laugh with them. I had a strong accent at the time and as soon as I spoke they got that I was for Northern Ireland and then saw sterling and were on board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never seen Scottish notes as I've never been to Scotland (yes yes I know, I need to) so would have no idea if they were ok or not if I was handed some. Most English people will probably never have encountered them and wouldn't know whether they'd be ok to accept or not.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest johnson1970

Apologies. Ignore the Euro part then. Also I don't know how to quote either. Sorry.

Edited by johnson1970

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a useful point to keep in mind, any company or individual is allowed to decide for themselves what they will accept for payment for things to be provided, be it entry to a show, photo-shoot, loaf of bread etc,

 

This means that regardless of the actual definition and purpose of 'legal tender' (which is always useful to know when arguing with a picky person like me :smile:) they can refuse to accept Scottish notes, £50 notes etc if they choose to and you cannot insist that they accept them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still waiting on SM to accept postage stamps for my auto's lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:unsure: If someone tried to pay for lots of photo-shoots and autographs entirely with wads of Scottish £5 notes, would it cause some kind of cataclysmic annihilation event which would end the universe? :uhoh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember years ago when my mum was paying for autos with an English £50 as she had went to bank to get english money but they didn't have anything smaller. Person taking the money wasn't very happy even though she spent £40 and she thought she had done the right thing by specifically bringing English notes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Johnson - was on another thread that someone says they saw someone pay for Summer Glau auto with Euros.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What gets me is that the English bailed out the Scottish banks and yet they still use Scottish notes...

Eh ????? I don't think so

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say when i worked in retail we would get the odd Scottish note.

 

I personally would always be a little skeptical as i had no way of telling if they were real or not (not like with English notes)

 

I would say next time it might be worth exchanging them for English notes or getting some extra cash out at a cash point.

But the whole point of the original post is that we Scots shouldn't be treated any differently since we are all part of Britain. We shouldn't need to get English money out. Admittedly I do do this, ever since my Scottish money was refused at a signing table (really embarrassing with the actor looking on at me being refused service).

 

As for not being able to tell if they are real - you do it the same way you do with any British money. Check it against the light and also look for the metallic strip. No different. Working in retail you must know that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a useful point to keep in mind, any company or individual is allowed to decide for themselves what they will accept for payment for things to be provided, be it entry to a show, photo-shoot, loaf of bread etc,

 

This means that regardless of the actual definition and purpose of 'legal tender' (which is always useful to know when arguing with a picky person like me :smile:) they can refuse to accept Scottish notes, £50 notes etc if they choose to and you cannot insist that they accept them.

 

Yes you are correct with what you are saying but works both ways, if a Scottish event or shopkeeper decided to not accept bank if England notes then they are within there right to refuse it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The English bailed out the Scottish banks?? Wasn't it the whole of the UK that bailed out the banks? Also, what specifically Scottish banks were bailed out?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually Scottish banknotes are not legal tender - even in Scotland. They are 'legal currency' ie not illegal to produce; but they don't have to be accepted by retailers (although they generally are). Think that this, along with the fact that we don't tend to see them down south, has led to confusion.

In addition to this 'English' banknotes are not legal tender in Scotland either - it is a quirk of Scottish law that no currency has the status of 'legal tender'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, by the time LF&CC 2015 rolls around the Scottish may well be independent and will have to ge their £ at a bureau de change (depending on which polliticians you believe).

Edited by gobo1979uk
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't have an issue in the venue actually, but it's maybe because I was paying with a mix of notes.

 

I did however, on four seperate occassions have problems spending Scottish notes at other locations in London, including two pubs, a McDonalds and the Science museum.

 

Unfortunately, the independence thing ain't gonna happen (pretty much every respectable poll has the Yes vote at around 35%), so spending Scottish notes in the south of England is always gonna be an issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest johnson1970

Please ignore post. Misread post. Apologies again.

Edited by johnson1970

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If they accept Euros without question they should accept ours too. Quite unacceptable. Thankfully did not have this problem myself as all my Scottish notes were accepted. Might just be individuals lacking knowledge.

 

They accept Euros at SM events?!?! What?!

When I exchange the money, I naturally get 50 pound notes too, but almost every time the crew seems suspicious when I hand them over. Are those notes really that rare in everyday use?

 

According to my oldest brother who is now a retired Met Police Officer, £50 notes are both the most common forged note and also the least in general retail circulation. At work we recently had notification that certain £50 note designs/numbered sequences were being withdrawn due to counterfitting. To my personal knowledge, the £20 note is the highest available from cash points in the UK.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

If they accept Euros without question they should accept ours too. Quite unacceptable. Thankfully did not have this problem myself as all my Scottish notes were accepted. Might just be individuals lacking knowledge.

 

They accept Euros at SM events?!?! What?!

When I exchange the money, I naturally get 50 pound notes too, but almost every time the crew seems suspicious when I hand them over. Are those notes really that rare in everyday use?

According to my oldest brother who is now a retired Met Police Officer, £50 notes are both the most common forged note and also the least in general retail circulation. At work we recently had notification that certain £50 note designs/numbered sequences were being withdrawn due to counterfitting. To my personal knowledge, the £20 note is the highest available from cash points in the UK.

In what way? In terms of forged to genuine of each note (eg number of forged £50 notes to genuine £50 notes compaired to all other notes issued? Or in total number?

 

The below link gives an idea of forged Bank of England notes:

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/pages/about/counterfeits.aspx#

 

On Scottish notes I've never had a problem.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

If they accept Euros without question they should accept ours too. Quite unacceptable. Thankfully did not have this problem myself as all my Scottish notes were accepted. Might just be individuals lacking knowledge.

They accept Euros at SM events?!?! What?!

When I exchange the money, I naturally get 50 pound notes too, but almost every time the crew seems suspicious when I hand them over. Are those notes really that rare in everyday use?

According to my oldest brother who is now a retired Met Police Officer, £50 notes are both the most common forged note and also the least in general retail circulation. At work we recently had notification that certain £50 note designs/numbered sequences were being withdrawn due to counterfitting. To my personal knowledge, the £20 note is the highest available from cash points in the UK.

In what way? In terms of forged to genuine of each note (eg number of forged £50 notes to genuine £50 notes compaired to all other notes issued? Or in total number?

 

The below link gives an idea of forged Bank of England notes:

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/pages/about/counterfeits.aspx#

 

On Scottish notes I've never had a problem.

 

If you are referring to the £50 notes in general retail circulation, then actual real ones. Many reasons are suggested as to why this is and they range from people not liking to carry them as losing them is a very heavy hit compared to a £10 or £20, or the fact cash machines don't usually dispense them. After he moved to the CID division he obviously did more detective work compared to being in uniform and thus certain trends popped up. I can remember him telling me about 10 years ago that whenever he investigated a shop burgulary or robbery the majority of notes stolen were £20 and £10 due to them being the most in general circulation and the usual denominations dispensed from cash machines.

 

I persoanlly would not like to carry £50 notes too much as the thought of losing them is horrible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I accept the argument that English people may have never seen a Scottish note before however anyone working with cash for showmasters should be trained as to what is and what isn't acceptable currency.

 

If you start a job in retail they would train you and let you know that 'this is sterling and acceptable, we don't accept Euros etc etc'

 

If Showmasters aren't training their cash handlers on what is and isn't acceptable currency then that's just laziness or poor management. No excuses

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×