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CurlyKirsty

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About CurlyKirsty

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    Assistant Editor
  1. Courtney Woods, Ah yes there's been a spillage. LOL
  2. CurlyKirsty

    Organisation of LFCC

    Please don't belittle the experience, I found it very stressful inside the hall and I am an experienced conventioner. Most of the problems were due to unrealistic expectations from a lot of new people who queued up and didn't have tickets beforehand and they were quite vocal. I had problems and I prepared by bringing bottles of water that had been frozen overnight, kept my expectations to a minimum and only planned a couple of signings and a talk. As I say, I am experienced so it was harder for newbies to cope.
  3. CurlyKirsty

    Signed items

    We have a Phoenix Copper autograph book that needs signatures.I also have a poster that Benedict can sign seeing as we already have his sig in the book.
  4. CurlyKirsty

    Thoughts about the Sherlocked talk at LFCC ?

    Not disappointed, thought it was very good of them to come along and give their time to a fan event. Mark Gatiss was his usual charming self, he and Steven Moffatt are huge Sherlock fans and you need to have read the original Sherlock books to catch everything they said in relation to the show I suppose. I wanted to ask them what they talk about on train journeys now as that will give us some idea on the next successful show. LOL
  5. CurlyKirsty

    Tempreture inside/out at WLFCC

    Taking off a jumper just doesn't compare to it. It's an interesting experience to wear a hooped skirt or have a bustle and the lacing means that you need assistance getting in and out of the dress unless it has buttons and that all depends on the class system of the character you want to cosplay. You have to consider the logistics which means going on the less busy day if possible to make sure you have enough space around you as the way you move is dictated by the size of the dress.
  6. CurlyKirsty

    Tempreture inside/out at WLFCC

    well having used LFCC as a scout round to see what type of cosplay would work...I'm thinking I should give up on anything involving a crinoline as I wouldn't get between the stalls or into the loos. The tempreture was a major concern....synthetic materials weren't a good idea I'll stick to cotton and linen in future. ...and pockets...lots and lots of pockets needed so no bags to carry. For a big dress, it can get quite hot, make sure you have water to hand. I did similar cosplay in November last year so I know I wouldn't wear it in July but October is do-able, make sure you plan as much as possible. With food and drink don't carry too much yourself, make sure you have a companion to assist you with this and carrying autos, pics and shopping etc. You will have problems moving around quickly so take your time and limit the amount of autos and photos you get. Have a plan on how to handle going to the bathroom, ie know where the disabled toilets are, do try to train your bladder as you don't want to make too many trips but want to be comfortable. Don't do too much, take some free talks in as then you are sitting for part of the day. It's not easy to stand up all day, the victorians didn't so you shouldn't either. Looking forward to seeing you in your costume.
  7. But I can blame them. They are the events organisers and I know what that means. It means you are responsible for the running of the event and the attendee experience. If they had been visible and monitoring the queue the touts wouldn't have been able to do that. If they had recced the venue appropriately they would have had a back up plan. Like. I said- I do their job.Additionally I'm criticising their whole ticketing system which is outdated and clearly doesn't work. People don't know months in advance if they will be free that weekend in this day and age - weirdly people work Saturdays a lot now. Yep I work all weekends except when I book this off as holiday aproximately six months in advance, I'm not stupid. I purchased my tickets three weeks prior to the event, usually I get standard but they had stopped selling them. Realising that meant capacity had been reached if I hadn't managed to get earlybird tickets I wouldn't have bothered turning up on the day. But then I use common sense such as bring my own bottled water that has been in the freezer all night so it defrosts throughout the day and makes an excellent cold compress when you are stuck in a queue. Showmasters warned us time and again that this was going to be big but demand obviously overtook all expectation and results in people accusing the Showmaster team of being all about sucking money out of customers and then moaning that Showmaster's didn't take your money for autographs or photos, ie they didn't deliver what you wanted. They also get accused of not training crew enough, my answer to that is for you to go work for showmasters if you think things need changing. The crew is primarily people who used to be customers like you, and at least you get into the event for sure then. Yes I am being cheeky but really you should email and volunteer to crew. You sound like the type of person that Showmasters needs. I am glad that you are able to book time off that far in advance. However in my lime of work and I am sure in others, we could be required to change days off last minute due to events coming that need experienced staff to be on site- and we know that, I also have other commitments in life that aren't up for discussion but mean every weekend isn't my own and that again is a situation many find themselves in. Be cheeky, that's fine to do, I could do it better, by the sounds of the people here most of you guys could do it better too- however- I can't- because of the above. I'd love to- really- and if my company was allowed to help them run this event I would do it like a shot- but showmasters would rather run off free volunteers than a paid members of staff. (And I'm sure a lot of them are more than capable too! I didn't see any but others have mentioned them and showmasters lucked out with such good free support- I commend them!)That's their business decision and I'm sure it's a nice thing for volunteers to put on their CV. However there comes a time when corners shouldn't get cut like this-morally if not legally- if they aren't briefed, if they don't know what they should be doing, or what the crowd should be doing- then not only are they the face of showmasters bringing it into disrepute with bad behaviour, but they are a danger in an emergency situation. How half this stuff passed risk assessments I don't know- I fill those damn forms out all the time and it would be on me- the event organiser- if something was overlooked and people got hurt. I'm not lucky, its one thing that the bloodsucking company I work for can't take away from me. I too have to put up with not knowing what shift I am doing till the day before and twice I've only had one hours notice that someone has changed the rota and put me down to work without asking or even notifying me so yeah that's how lucky I am. Conventions are one thing that are so important to me that I will not budge on. I book time off in advance and if they ring up to say I'm working then tough titty cause I'm at the event. So yes I know what having a crappy and demanding job is like and I'm on minimum wage to boot.
  8. CurlyKirsty

    Thank You Anonymous Awesome Person

    One thing to add to this is that if someone does something nice for you, then pay it forward. It's a lovely story.
  9. CurlyKirsty

    Volunteers

    I think you are under the misaprehension that we are there in another capacity, we are there to do a job. It doesn't matter if we are a fan of the person we are GA (guest assist) or not, I have had a lovely time with Sports guests and the fact that I am more empathetic with people who feel excited about meeting their hero/heroine or favourite actor/actress/sportsperson/celebrity is the thing that connects us as fans. I may not be in the same fandom but I relate to how attendee's feel and aim to make it as easy and pleasant as possible. Just because crew are made up of mainly volunteers doesn't mean we are not professional or take our role very seriously. I have to say it is not easy, you can't just swan off to the loo whenever you want, most times you don't get to meet the celebs as you are working elsewhere, often I leave autos at their desk before it opens with money to be able to get my autos, we don't always get them back signed and in one case one is still missing. That is reality, it doesn't give you unlimited access, in fact you have to damp down excitement and focus on what you are doing when the celebrity that you most admire is walking past you. Very hard to do but necessary if you ever want to crew again. We get assigned different roles to make us better crew, the more rounded you are as a crew member the better you perform. Don't any of your friends crew for Showmasters? Can't say I am surprised as you used the phrase that you were a "paying customer" so of course you would see it as them and us. For the record I paid entrance on Saturday too, but my experience was probably better because I see a blue shirt and automatically treat them like a friend now, at one point I went up and fanned one to cool down as she looked like she needed it, I also picked up some rubbish from the floor and put it in the bin. The crew are not inhuman clones serving Jason or automatons and we are not walking encyclopeadia either so don't treat us that way. I got into crewing after several of my friends suggested it as they crewed, I finally jumped in when i was made redundant and it was the only way to get an auto that I wanted for my daughter. I have since got a job and am still crewing. I had a terrible first day as I felt really rough with a cold and my voice gave out at one point but came back because I felt like I made a difference. I hope that this post gives people a clearer idea of what it is about, it's not about hob nobbing with celebrities, its seriously hard work on Sunday night having to carry chairs and pile them on pallets ready to remove at the end. You ache all over, you're exhausted to the point of tears, you still got to pick up all the rubbish and yet you are still smiling cause someone just cracked an awful joke. That's what being Showmaster crew is all about, we don't get to go until everything is cleared and the hall is empty. I hope this helps you understand what being crew entails. We were just trying to entice you to try it just once rather than criticize without understanding what crewing is about. It would be nice if more people crewed as you could go to conventions and enjoy it but working at them is very rewarding. (I'm not talking money or autograph value)
  10. CurlyKirsty

    Experiences with Guests!

    I had three guests that I wanted to meet; Daniel Kash, I was very upset that he had no Dresden Files photos so I have come away with an auto which I will probably sell in future, once I have a print that I want. Couldn't have a posed photo so I should have just paid for a photo but it still would have been out of character. Oh well. He has promised to come back to another event and bring some Dresden Files prints. Lena Hedley, rather upset that Showmasters lost the original print that she was supposed to sign last year. I paid for a new one but of course now I have to wait for Thomas Dekker to come back and sign it all over again and it's cost me double for both autographs as I don't have the original. Summer Glau, very grateful that I managed to get her autograph as it was literally the end of the day and then she goes and used two different coloured pens and messed up but I have to take what I am given. It's disappointing overall but as the print is already signed I can't do anything about it. Whilst I achieved what I wanted in regards of getting autographs it didn't pan out the way I hoped the day would go. Not Showmasters fault, but it was just a series of circumstances that add up to me feeling a little bit flat. Just to end on a good note, I got to meet Jemma Redgrave and have a chat, was lucky enough to grab a friend walking past to take a photo at the table with her. Was my only photo of me during the day. I paid for autographs with Jenna Coleman and John Hurt although I didn't get to go in the queue, my daughter and her friend reported they had a fantastic meeting, particularly John Hurt who remarked that there wasn't much space for him to sign (it's a Tardis print with multiple autographs of all the Doctors with only Capaldi to go now).
  11. CurlyKirsty

    Volunteers

    I know people don't always have internet access thats why we have an information desk, all the details are placed on huge wall posters around the desk and also the photo timetables are up at each photo area. I managed to find the showmaster merch and programme at the silent auction kiosk as I asked at the information desk by the entrance. Can't say why they gave you the runaround and then gave me clear directions on how to get there. Don't know why the system worked for me and not you. All I can say is sorry. Please do crew next time.
  12. CurlyKirsty

    Volunteers

    What do you mean we are not "professional"? Most of the Showmaster crew are highly trained, every day that we volunteer we gain more experience. My favourite job is GA or Runner on the sports section,as I am not a sports fan, so i'm not tempted to get all fangirly over them and it is usually a quieter environment (I'm HOH). I find it quite daunting to GA so I am relieved I've not had to do that so much as its a huge responsibility. I don't like the green room so much because I am very nervous about spilling tea or coffee down some poor celeb. Photos are very sociable, the different teams build camaraderie. LOL and queue control is the most exhausting job imo. You are on your feet all day and loose your voice. Many of the volunteers have been doing it for years and do all the events and some of us are not able to do as many events (I've been crewing for almost three years and have done about six different events so far most in London and one in Cardiff) I got into crewing by peer pressure, several of my friends who crew suggested it and I just tried it to see how I felt. How did I feel? Like death warmed up! It was bloody awful. But I made even more friends and then hung out with people who I thought I hated and found out they are actually really nice. (I am a cheeky cow given half the chance so was kinda deserving of being told no on many occasions but now I am so pleased that those women didn't make judgements bout me and I actually count them as friends) I think that all newbies have had a baptism of fire this weekend and deserve applause, in time they will learn to direct all questions to the information desk by the front door. I feel so sorry for you not getting your question answered but it's quite overwhelming and if you couldn't be bothered to print out and bring maps, shedules, autograph price lists etc then how do you expect that poor hapless crew member (probably dashing to the toilets) to have it all to hand? Yes before you start saying that's unreasonable to print out all the info and bring it; I am anal enough to print out all the info and the crew handbook and bring it with me, I even printed all the info this saturday when I wasn't crewing. Oh and who the heck is this Marsden guy?
  13. CurlyKirsty

    Who was that person thread

    If you can post a pic or give a better description as there are several Clara's who attended the show. Which episode clothes? Was she skinnier and french? You should check out this facebook page as you will probably find her on here. https://www.facebook.com/ClaraOswaldCosplay
  14. But I can blame them. They are the events organisers and I know what that means. It means you are responsible for the running of the event and the attendee experience. If they had been visible and monitoring the queue the touts wouldn't have been able to do that. If they had recced the venue appropriately they would have had a back up plan. Like. I said- I do their job. Additionally I'm criticising their whole ticketing system which is outdated and clearly doesn't work. People don't know months in advance if they will be free that weekend in this day and age - weirdly people work Saturdays a lot now. Yep I work all weekends except when I book this off as holiday aproximately six months in advance, I'm not stupid. I purchased my tickets three weeks prior to the event, usually I get standard but they had stopped selling them. Realising that meant capacity had been reached if I hadn't managed to get earlybird tickets I wouldn't have bothered turning up on the day. But then I use common sense such as bring my own bottled water that has been in the freezer all night so it defrosts throughout the day and makes an excellent cold compress when you are stuck in a queue. Showmasters warned us time and again that this was going to be big but demand obviously overtook all expectation and results in people accusing the Showmaster team of being all about sucking money out of customers and then moaning that Showmaster's didn't take your money for autographs or photos, ie they didn't deliver what you wanted. They also get accused of not training crew enough, my answer to that is for you to go work for showmasters if you think things need changing. The crew is primarily people who used to be customers like you, and at least you get into the event for sure then. Yes I am being cheeky but really you should email and volunteer to crew. You sound like the type of person that Showmasters needs.
  15. CurlyKirsty

    Volunteers

    Send that email now, it will be one of the best things you could do as all of the crew are lovely people (especially the ones that you thought were complete meanies) and they will be your best friends and you will feel part of the family. Good luck.
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