Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rainbowchazer

Great day at LFCC but...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, DCGIRL1987 said:

I am glad i caught a glimpse now next time i can actually say hello properly with out me awkwardly trying to stare you out lol;)

giphy.gif

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/28/2019 at 12:17 AM, Queen_Sindel said:

The standing caused one of the worst comments I ever heard since I started going to conventions. A woman behind me in the queue for Robert Carlyle's photoshoot started complaining why attendees in wheelchairs were getting priority cause they were already sitting all day.

I am aware I should have at the very least asked her if she had lost her mind, but for the first time in quite a while I had been at a loss for words.

Maybe should have channeled my inner bear and just clawed her eyes out.

I hate to be an ignorant ass, but I don't really get it either though :unsure:

I'd obviously never make a comment like that and when you're on crutches or have a certain mental condition that does make perfect sense to me to get priority. But yeah, I don't really understand for some others. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'd like to understand it as I don't think I actually know anyone with a disability.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

I hate to be an ignorant ass, but I don't really get it either though :unsure:

I'd obviously never make a comment like that and when you're on crutches or have a certain mental condition that does make perfect sense to me to get priority. But yeah, I don't really understand for some others. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'd like to understand it as I don't think I actually know anyone with a disability.

 

Good God almighty. Absolute state of this post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In terms of the original post.

1. I had the same situation when I turned up at Earls Court on Sunday morning. To be honest though, you can walk from Earls Court to Olympia in 10mins, simply walk around the back of Earls Court, across Brompton Road - pretty straightforward on Google maps.

2. Seating has always been issue, even when it was at Earls Court 2.

The best thing to do is out at lunchtime (if your schedule permits) an get something to eat and drink at a nearby restaurant or pub. We usually goto a pub not far away - not the one right outside though. 

This was my first LFCC in a couple of years, and I must admit it was very well run. Heat was the biggest problem, just a matter of keeping yourself hydrated and pop out into the fresh cooler air.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

I hate to be an ignorant ass, but I don't really get it either though :unsure:

I'd obviously never make a comment like that and when you're on crutches or have a certain mental condition that does make perfect sense to me to get priority. But yeah, I don't really understand for some others. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'd like to understand it as I don't think I actually know anyone with a disability.

 

I have three invisible chronic heart conditions (Tachycardia, three leaky heart valves and left over damage from two heart failures).  I am otherwise very healthy.  To the casual passer by I appear normal as I can walk around.   However, can't stand up for long as it puts pressure on my heart.  Because of these conditions I can go into difficulty quite easily.  I got the extra help pass after a recommendation at DST and it helped.  I decided to go for it again at LFCC.  

As I am aware that I can look very healthy on good days I carry around with me my medical alert ID and my heart monitor.   If anyone questions why I am in the extra help section I can then show them.  

I know there are many others like me and it isn't always obvious.  I get that queues can be frustrating at the best of times but a little understanding can help.  

Edited by Legolassie Malfoy
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

I hate to be an ignorant ass, but I don't really get it either though :unsure:

I'd obviously never make a comment like that and when you're on crutches or have a certain mental condition that does make perfect sense to me to get priority. But yeah, I don't really understand for some others. I'm not trying to be rude, but I'd like to understand it as I don't think I actually know anyone with a disability.

 

Without wanting to sound rude, perhaps a little compassion wouldn’t go amiss. Not every disability is visible, and not every medical condition confines sufferers to a wheelchair. Just because those of us who do not suffer cannot see what causes someone pain or the need for extra help does not mean it doesn’t exist.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone who calls someone out for a disability because they “can’t see” one is an ignoramus. Sure there are probably people “playing the system”, just as there are some claiming benefits unjustly but nobody has any right to go around making accusations or casting aspersions on peoples’ characters and ruining their LFCC... instant permanent bans from any future cons for them imo...:angry2:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Legolassie Malfoy said:

I have three invisible chronic heart conditions (Tachycardia, three leaky heart valves and left over damage from two heart failures).  I am otherwise very healthy.  To the casual passer by I appear normal as I can walk around.   However, can't stand up for long as it puts pressure on my heart.  Because of these conditions I can go into difficulty quite easily.  I got the extra help pass after a recommendation at DST and it helped.  I decided to go for it again at LFCC.  

As I am aware that I can look very healthy on good days I carry around with me my medical alert ID and my heart monitor.   If anyone questions why I am in the extra help section I can then show them.  

I know there are many others like me and it is always obvious.  I get that queues can be frustrating at the best of times but a little understanding can help.  

Thank you for giving me an example, instead of shaming/ridiculing me like some above. I hope everything went well for you during the weekend :) 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TheLocalWizard said:

Without wanting to sound rude, perhaps a little compassion wouldn’t go amiss. Not every disability is visible, and not every medical condition confines sufferers to a wheelchair. Just because those of us who do not suffer cannot see what causes someone pain or the need for extra help does not mean it doesn’t exist.

I certainly don't claim every disability is visible and I want you to know that there's nothing wrong with my compassion. I would never roll my eyes, dispute someone being in the access queue or someone asking me if a person could cut in because it's difficult for this person to stand in a queue. Thing is that I don't want to be ignorant, I would like to understand what about it is difficult for a person. Comprehension is incredibly important, because otherwise you get people who ask "why a person in a wheelchair gets priority since they are sitting down all day" like Queen Sindel described. So no worries, I don't think you're sounding rude ;) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Chris1970 said:

Now I am lost for words... :angry:

 

32 minutes ago, Ravogd said:

Good God almighty. Absolute state of this post.

To be fair he asked politely and was trying to be respectful with a genuine question, although it’s a questionable question you can tell there wasn’t any hate made purposely there

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/27/2019 at 10:05 PM, Rainbowchazer said:

 

The two things that really caught us out this year were:

a) that the only way to the venue by train seemed to be to go to West Brompton and change there. Wasn't there a direct link from Earl's Court before?

 

I mixed it up this year and went to Barons Court on the Piccadilly line, then walked. Amazing, only takes 8-10 minutes so you can fit in the album version of Purple Rain. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Rydog2k said:

 

To be fair he asked politely and was trying to be respectful with a genuine question, although it’s a questionable question you can tell there wasn’t any hate made purposely there

Don’t know why I’m replying as most of these posts will be removed once a mod sees anyway but the fact that the question was even asked, no matter how politely, IS the very problem that has been shown. You just accept that it is needed. You don’t need a reason or examples. I’d like to know why xyz is able to afford that car, do I have a right to ask him to give me examples from his bank statement to see how he can afford it? Medical professionals have assessed people. These medical assessments have been checked by Showmasters extra help team who have supplied a band. The person has a band. In society. People with disabilities both visible and non-visible DO NOT need to explain why they need help to anyone and to ask for examples to be educated is downright rude even if you try to mask it with “ I don’t want to appear rude, but” at the beginning or ask in the nicest way without hate. We need to get to a point where society just accepts these things blindly without explanations. There is no need to “educate” just accept. Simple.

Edited by Ravogd
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

Thank you for giving me an example, instead of shaming/ridiculing me like some above. I hope everything went well for you during the weekend :) 

What it ha taken you to “understand” is a person (albeit providing it willingly) telling you a medical condition that is private to them. I am glad you now understand but what if nobody had been prepared to provide this incredibly personal detail to you? You would still be ignorant. The question itself (however kindly and nicely put) was ignorant and rude and did not need to be asked. Happily most people don’t have to live with disability and I am glad that nobody in your family or friends seems to have to bear one but I’m sorry, for people that do have to adapt 24/7 and have to deal with things your question, however well intended, is offensive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have Tachycardia. I look normal but have to balance things in order not to get very ill later. I also have huge issues in crowds. When I do a lot of walking I have to take a stick with me to help. I’ve been going to cons for 15 years I’ve waited hours for things. Last 2 years i started to get ill so I’ve requested access help at various cons. I can’t tell how much I sometimes wish I could still wait in those long queues. How I wish I felt as normal as I sometimes look. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Ravogd said:

Don’t know why I’m replying as most of these posts will be removed once a mod sees anyway but the fact that the question was even asked, no matter how politely, IS the very problem that has been shown. You just accept that it is needed. You don’t need a reason or examples. I’d like to know why xyz is able to afford that car, do I have a right to ask him to give me examples from his bank statement to see how he can afford it? Medical professionals have assessed people. These medical assessments have been checked by Showmasters extra help team who have supplied a band. The person has a band. In society. People with disabilities both visible and non-visible DO NOT need to explain why they need help to anyone and to ask for examples to be educated is downright rude even if you try to mask it with “ I don’t want to appear rude, but” at the beginning or ask in the nicest way without hate. We need to get to a point where society just accepts these things blindly without explanations. There is no need to “educate” just accept. Simple.

 

Don't get me wrong, I do agree with a great part of your post. As said in response to another, I'm not saying that people at the convention have to prove it to me. As you said they're checked by Showmasters, etc. etc. I would never dispute if someone with an acces pass really needs it. So as I always have done at every convention I ever attended, I do blindly accept it. I would never assume someone is faking it.

People do not need to explain at all, which is why I ask this question on a forum and would never do so in real life (to a stranger). I'm not asking a person on here directly (which would be incredibly rude). It's a general question. People who want to give an example can do so (anonomously), those who don't want to explain or talk about it can just ignore that question. (And if anyone takes offense, than certainly my apologies as that was not the intent.)

The one thing I heavily disagree on is that we need to get to a point where society accepts things blindly without explanations. If anything, I find it quite a dangerous sentiment. I personally find understanding, discussing and education to be incredibly important. Someone else mentioned compassion. I find compassion incredibly important, but it mostly comes from understanding and not because society tells you to have it. I feel no question should ever be taboo if asked in a respectful manner and the person is willing to talk about it.

I do understand your position and you seem to have a very strong opinion on the issue, so all my respect for that of course.

 

Edited by dogsoldierspoon
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take no offence to your question @dogsoldierspoon! I find it great that you are seeking information about disabilities so you can better your understanding. There should be more people like you in the world! I have a disability that have a lot of misinformation and making sure that medical professionals as well as people who are in the lives of people with this disability are educated is very important. It was not like you went up in someone's face and asked "What the spam is wrong with you?".

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

Thank you for giving me an example, instead of shaming/ridiculing me like some above. I hope everything went well for you during the weekend :) 

You're welcome.  It did, thank you.  I hope it went well for you too.  

 

I was concerned that the heat would set off any heart troubles but thankfully I stayed within manageable limits.   

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, dogsoldierspoon said:

 

Don't get me wrong, I do agree with a great part of your post. As said in response to another, I'm not saying that people at the convention have to prove it to me. As you said they're checked by Showmasters, etc. etc. I would never dispute if someone with an acces pass really needs it. So as I always have done at every convention I ever attended, I do blindly accept it. I would never assume someone is faking it.

People do not need to explain at all, which is why I ask this question on a forum and would never do so in real life (to a stranger). I'm not asking a person on here directly (which would be incredibly rude). It's a general question. People who want to give an example can do so (anonomously), those who don't want to explain or talk about it can just ignore that question. (And if anyone takes offense, than certainly my apologies as that was not the intent.)

The one thing I heavily disagree on is that we need to get to a point where society accepts things blindly without explanations. If anything, I find it quite a dangerous sentiment. I personally find understanding, discussing and education to be incredibly important. Someone else mentioned compassion. I find compassion incredibly important, but it mostly comes from understanding and not because society tells you to have it. I feel no question should ever be taboo if asked in a respectful manner and the person is willing to talk about it.

I do understand your position and you seem to have a very strong opinion on the issue, so all my respect for that of course.

 

I understand. I do get that you were trying to ask a genuine question. I am a carer for my disabled partner and I have very strong feelings on the issue so I can tend to get angry easily about it. I wasn't meaning everyhting should be blindly accepted, just that it is impossible to educate everyone about all the different possibilities and that in this specific area people just have to accept what is in front of them. I appreciate your reply and am glad you have a better understanding now. The question will for some people always be taboo and offensive though but I really do appreciate you taking the time to explain yourself and I apologise for getting angry. I'll offer a virtual handshake at this point. For the sake of the thread I wont mention anything else about it nor do I think anyone else should. Lets get back to topic.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Ravogd said:

I understand. I do get that you were trying to ask a genuine question. I am a carer for my disabled partner and I have very strong feelings on the issue so I can tend to get angry easily about it. I wasn't meaning everyhting should be blindly accepted, just that it is impossible to educate everyone about all the different possibilities and that in this specific area people just have to accept what is in front of them. I appreciate your reply and am glad you have a better understanding now. The question will for some people always be taboo and offensive though but I really do appreciate you taking the time to explain yourself and I apologise for getting angry. I'll offer a virtual handshake at this point. For the sake of the thread I wont mention anything else about it nor do I think anyone else should. Lets get back to topic.  

Virtual handshake accepted. In retrospect, I probably should've elaborated more in my original post. It certainly is impossible to educate everyone, but the more the better and I do wish there was more general understanding, but yeah... people. I do get that it's not an easy topic and can not fathom the blunt ignorance you and your partner have to deal with. So certainly all good luck, support and respect to you.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Legolassie Malfoy said:

You're welcome.  It did, thank you.  I hope it went well for you too.  

 

I was concerned that the heat would set off any heart troubles but thankfully I stayed within manageable limits.   

 

 

I had a good weekend as well, thank you for asking. Glad the heat didn't get the best of you ^_^

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/27/2019 at 11:17 PM, Queen_Sindel said:

The standing caused one of the worst comments I ever heard since I started going to conventions. A woman behind me in the queue for Robert Carlyle's photoshoot started complaining why attendees in wheelchairs were getting priority cause they were already sitting all day.

I am aware I should have at the very least asked her if she had lost her mind, but for the first time in quite a while I had been at a loss for words.

Maybe should have channeled my inner bear and just clawed her eyes out.

Of interest, the only place, as a wheelchair user that I got priority was a photoshoot (Shatner's) and his autograph queue (although I did not get bumped to the front, just slotted in somewhere half way along in that one. (But I suspect my Diamond Pass also played a role in that)

Elsewhere, in other autograph queues, despite having the wrist band no priority was given, neither with a VQ ticket nor in open queues. Basically I was told to queue as per 'normal' folk. Thus rendering the orange special needs wrist band all but useless. But yes, to that women who thinks sitting all day in a wheelchair is a lark, well, as the saying goes, I will trade you your ability to stand and walk for my disability. Sitting in a wheelchair for many hours can get downright uncomfortable, issues with pressure and for me, with FSHD, my preferred position is lying down, sitting puts enormous strains on my lower back and abdominal areas and staying like that for prolonged periods leads to serious pain and breathing becoming more difficult. Rather than 'sitting' in a wheelchair in a queue for long periods, I'd rather get things over quickly and go lie down.

But yes, those orange wrist bands did not seem to get much help at all anywhere this weekend just gone.

Edited by Taggle
spelling correction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Taggle said:

Of interest, the only place, as a wheelchair user that I got priority was a photoshoot (Shatner's) and his autograph queue (although I did not get bumped to the front, just slotted in somewhere half way along in that one. (But I suspect my Diamond Pass also played a role in that)

Elsewhere, in other autograph queues, despite having the wrist band no priority was given, neither with a VQ ticket nor in open queues. Basically I was told to queue as per 'normal' folk. Thus rendering the orange special needs wrist band all but useless. But yes, to that women who thinks sitting all day in a wheelchair is a lark, well, as the saying goes, I will trade you your ability to stand and walk for my disability. Sitting in a wheelchair for many hours can get downright uncomfortable, issues with pressure and for me, with FSHD, my preferred position is lying down, sitting puts enormous strains on my lower back and abdominal areas and staying like that for prolonged periods leads to serious pain and breathing becoming more difficult. Rather than 'sitting' in a wheelchair in a queue for long periods, I'd rather get things over quickly and go lie down.

But yes, those orange wrist bands did not seem to get much help at all anywhere this weekend just gone.

To be fair the extra help doesn't get you right to the front, the policy (according to the FAQ) is that for people with extra help they will attempt to ensure that you don't queue for more than 10 minutes. That is why they slot you in at a seemingly random point in the line. It's not designed to give priority to the disabled rather attempt to alleviate the queueing that can be horrendous for disabled attendees.

I'm sorry that your experience was that you didn't get much extra help with your band but I have to say that my partner was looked after very well as were quite a few other extra help attendees who have praised Showmasters for the weekend. We were always placed right at the entrance for photo ops (admittedly after a horrendous journey of "EXCUSE ME") through people waiting for their shoot. 

In future if a blue shirt is not giving you the expected extra help asistance you should.ask them to call for a red shirt who should (hopefully) correct them to the proper Showmasters policy and give you the treatment you are entitled to.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter and I went to Lfcc for the first time and we had extra help for my daughter as she suffers a lot with leg pain due to hyper mobility syndrome and her knees give way when standing. Overall we had mostly good experience from the crew though we did meet a few who were really dismissive and unhelpful to my daughter because she is young and looked fine, they didn't see her tears and pain every day nor that she was dosed to the eyeballs with painkillers to make it through the day. We took our own little foldable stool and that made her time much easier to cope when waiting

as much as there was problems with general members of the public being rude to people with orange bands (we had several nasty comments said ‘quietly’ behind us about extra help people), we also had a problem with some of the other extra help people being downright rude themselves and shoving my daughter and others to the side so they could be first and being really nasty to crew if they weren't put to the front 

My daughter did have an amazing time though thanks to the pass as we definitely wouldn't have managed without it.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...