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Found 35 results

  1. Comic Guest Announcement - Ian Richardson Attending: Saturday & Sunday Ian is a comic book penciller, inker and cover artist best known for his work across several publishers, working on titles from 2000AD, Image Comics, Marvel UK/Panini, Darkhorse Comics & Zenescope Entertainment among others. Like many UK artists, Ian's first professional comics work started at 2000AD working on various Future Shocks, Sinister Dexter & Judge Dredd stories before moving onto Image Comics & the Nobles Causes series for a couple of years. With various stops along the way that have included initial work on the graphic novel for the Harrison Ford & Daniel Craig Cowboys & Aliens movie, some children friendly work on Captain America, the Falcon & Iron Man stories for Marvel UK/Panini, all the way through to work on the Halo comic books at Dark Horse Comics. Currently Ian is a regular cover artist every month for Zenescope Entertainment across their Red Agent, Evil Heroes, Grimm's Fairy Tales, Spirit Hunters, Black Sable titles and more! You'll also find Ian as the penciller for all the art on the soon to be released later this year title The Unthinkables.
  2. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Andy Diggle Attending: Saturday & Sunday The Losers, 2000AD, Hellblazer, Daredevil, James Bond Andy Diggle is a comics writer and former editor of cult British comic 2000AD. He is currently writing JAMES BOND. Andy is best know for collaborating with Jock on THE LOSERS, which was adapted into the film starring Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Chris Evans, Zoe Saldana and Idris Elba; and GREEN ARROW: YEAR ONE, which partially inspired the hit TV show ARROW. Andy's creator-owned work includes SNAPSHOT, RAT CATCHER and SILENT DRAGON. His work for US publishers includes BATMAN, SUPERMAN, HELLBLAZER, SWAMP THING and ADAM STRANGE for DC Comics; DAREDEVIL, CAPTAIN AMERICA and THUNDERBOLTS for Marvel; DOCTOR WHO for IDW; THIEF OF THIEVES for Skybound; and UNCANNY and CONTROL for Dynamite. http://www.andydiggle.com/
  3. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mick McMahon Attending: Saturday & Sunday Artist: 2000 AD (Judge Dredd, ABC Warriors, Ro-Busters, Sláine); The Last American; Sonic the Comic; Tattered Banners; Tank Girl: Carioca ALTHOUGH John Wagner and Carlos Ezquerra created Judge Dredd, the iconic Lawman of the Future's first story appearance was drawn by Mick McMahon, who made his professional debut on the historic five-pager in 1977's 2000 AD Prog 2. After providing the art for the Dredd strips in the next two Progs, McMahon went on to become the Mega-City One lawman's most frequent artist over the next two years. Embellishing Ezquerra's design, the young illustrator – who has been credited as Mike McMahon throughout his career – provided Dredd with the characteristic look that remains the standard to this day. In 1979 he took a break from Dredd to illustrate Ro-Busters and then ABC Warriors for the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic. Returning to work on the Lawman of the Future into 1981, he next provided stories to three issues of Marvel UK's Doctor Who Weekly and then drew a 1982 issue of Starblazer: Space Fiction Adventures in Pictures for DC Thomson. He came back to 2000 AD in 1983 to draw the first Sláine stories but ill health forced him to discontinue the series in 1984. His return to the medium came six years later and on the other side of the Atlantic. In collaboration with Wagner and Alan Grant, he launched The Last American at Epic Comics, Marvel's creator owned imprint. That 1990 four-parter was followed by a 1991 return to Britain where he contributed to the first seven issues of Apocalypse's short-lived Toxic!. Then it was back to Epic – where McMahon had already contributed to three issues of Clive Barker's Hellraiser – for 1992's Alien Legion: Jugger Grimrod one-shot. That was followed over a year later by a three-issue Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight serial for DC. After that his comic work became increasingly more sporadic. Over the next four years he made an occasional return to 2000 AD and to Dredd (in Judge Dredd Megazine) and contributed to a couple of The Big Book of... volumes from DC's Piranha Press imprint. Then, in 1997, McMahon began a 21-issue association with Egmont Magazines' Sonic the Comic. It was followed in 1998 by Tattered Banners, a four-parter from Vertigo, DC's mature readers imprint. It wasn't until 2011 that his next storytelling project appeared. Published by Titan, the four-issue Tank Girl: Carioca was followed in 2012 by a contribution to Self Made Hero's Lovecraft Anthology. A year later he drew a two-issue serial for Dark Horse Presents, Dark Horse's flagship anthology. It was his last project to date. With his constantly evolving style McMahon is recognised as one of the major artistic talents to emerge from 2000 AD. Despite his low profile since the beginning of the new millennium, he remains a major inspiration to neophyte comics artists.
  4. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - David Roach Attending: Friday, Saturday & Sunday Artist: 2000 AD; Doctor Who Magazine; Batman/Demon Author: The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years; The Art of Jose Gonzales WELL known for his encyclopaedic knowledge of comics history and for his remarkable ability to identify the work of other (often obscure) comics artists, David Roach began his professional career drawing for 2000 AD. He worked on various strips for the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic between 1988 and 1992, when he made his US debut illustrating a 13-pager for issue #3 of Marvel’s creator-owned Epic anthology. Over the next three years he pencilled stories for both DC and Dark Horse contributing to such titles as Dark Horse Comics, Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi – Knights of the Old Republic, Darkstars and Lobo before drawing 1996’s Batman/Demon one-shot. Much in demand as an inker especially on Doctor Who Magazine, Roach’s next major project was Star Trek: Voyager – Avalon Rising, a 2000 one-shot for DC’s WildStorm imprint following which he renewed his connection with 2000 AD. He remains an infrequent contributor to the UK SF weekly and to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine. While now spending much of his time working outside of comics (among other things he provides illustrations for role-playing game manuals and storyboards for films), the artist maintains his virtually continuous 16-year long relationship with Doctor Who Magazine. Primarily working as an inker for the Marvel UK title, he most recently illustrated 2015's two-chapter Highgate Horror. The co-author of 2014's The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years for Dynamite (for which he also provides the occasional cover), Roach also wrote The Art of Jose Gonzalez for the New Jersey-based publisher the following year.
  5. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Lee Townsend Attending: Saturday & Sunday Artist: 2000 AD PROBABLY best-known for his contributions to such 2000 AD strips as Bison, Synammon and Breathing Space, Lee Townsend began his comics career in 2000 providing inks to the last three issues of Gary Frank’s Image/Top Cow six-parter, Kin. The artist, who had a brief stint working in animation for Dreamworks and Disney, has since provided finishes for a variety of titles, Judge Dredd Megazine, Marvel Heroes, Marvel Rampage, Transformers: Armada and Panini UK’s Spider-Man among them. The inker of Avatar Press’s Crossed: Wish You were Here between 2012 and 2014, Townsend also contributed to Spider-Man Annual 2015 for Panini and made a fleeting 2015 return to 2000 AD’s companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine after more than a decade. Following that Townsend illustrated a 10-issue run on The Official Ben 10 Magazine for Egmont. These days, however, he spends most of his time producing storyboards for advertising and character designs for the Cartoon Network
  6. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Carlos Ezquerra Attending: Friday, Saturday & Sunday Artist: 2000 AD – Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog; Bloody Mary; Adventures of the Rifle Brigade; Battle Picture Weekly TO MANY people he is the Spanish artist who created Judge Dredd’s iconic look but Carlos Ezquerra’s career encompasses so much more than that. He started his career drawing war and Western comics for Spanish publishers. After two years he was approached by two British comics publishing giants, and began working for Fleetway and DC Thomson in 1972. For the former he contributed to such romance titles as Valentine and Mirabelle while most of his output for DCT was on a variety of strips for The Wizard. He also worked on Top Sellers’ Pocket Western Library. In 1975 he moved on to IPC, specifically to Battle Picture Weekly, where he worked on a variety of strips, most notably Rat Pack and Major Eazy. Two years later he designed not only Judge Dredd but also the look of Mega-City One, the setting for the iconic Lawman of the Future’s stories, for 2000 AD. However the Spanish artist only illustrated Dredd’s historic first appearance (in Prog 2) and one other story before returning to Battle for the short-lived El Mestizo. From there he moved on to a new IPC weekly. For Starlord, which launched in 1978, he conceived Strontium Dog in collaboration with T.B. Grover (a pseudonym for writers John Wagner – with whom he co-created Judge Dredd – and Alan Grant). Before the year was out Starlord was merged with 2000 AD with the Grover/Ezquerra team migrating their mutant bounty hunter to the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. In 1982, Ezquerra, who drew virtually every one of Strontium Dog’s appearances until 1988, reunited with Wagner and Dredd for the classic Apocalypse War, a seven-month long epic which he illustrated in its entirety. He has continued to draw the Lawman of the Future’s exploits periodically ever since either in 2000 AD or its monthly companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine. He also worked with 2000 AD founder Pat Mills, with whom he conceived The Third World War, which ran in Crisis, 2000 AD’s politically themed companion title, from its launch in 1988. Ezquerra’s US debut came in 1995. The Spanish artist, who also co-created Fiends of the Easter Front [1980] and Durham Red [1991] for 2000 AD as well as drawing the weekly’s adaptations of Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat novels [beginning in 1979], drew DC’s Grant/Wagner-written Bob, the Galactic Bum four-parter. That was followed later in the year by a DC one-shot, Lobo: I Quit, and then in 1996 by the Garth Ennis-written Bloody Mary four-parter for Helix, DC’s short-lived science fiction imprint. The Spanish artist, who also co-created The Bad Man [1992] for the Megazine and Al’s Baby [1997] for 2000 AD, has never really slackened when it comes to contributing to the two British titles. His work for American publishers has, however, been more sporadic. Collaborating more often than not with Ennis, the Spanish artist’s US credits have included a 1997 Bloody Mary sequel and – for Vertigo (DC’s mature readers imprint) – 1997’s Preacher Special: The Good Old Boys and 2000’s four-issue Adventures of the Rifle Brigade and its 2001 sequel. Across the same period he also drew two Star Wars comics: 1997’s Bobba Fett #½ (for Wizard) and Dark Horse’s six-issue Mara Jade the following year. Those – unlike Black Bull Comics five-issue Just a Pilgrim [2001], its 2002 sequel and Vertigo’s 2003 one-shot, War Story: Condors –weren’t written by Ennis. With his 2000 AD/Megazine work continuing apace (primarily in partnership with Wagner), in 2005 Ezquerra illustrated The Authority: The Magnificent Kevin, a five-parter published by DC’s WildStorm imprint. That was written by Ennis as was the remainder of his US work: 2006’s A Man called Kev (another DC/WildStorm five-parter) and Battlefields: The Tankies, a three-parter published by Dynamite in 2009. After brief runs on DC/WildStorm’s Ennis-written The Boys [2009] and Dynamite’s 2010 and 2012 Battlefields series, Ezquerra eased back on his workload, restricting himself to 2000 AD and the Megazine, remaining a regular contributor to both to this day.
  7. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Carlos Ezquerra Attending: Saturday & Sunday Artist: 2000 AD – Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog; Bloody Mary; Adventures of the Rifle Brigade; Battle Picture Weekly TO MANY people he is the Spanish artist who created Judge Dredd’s iconic look but Carlos Ezquerra’s career encompasses so much more than that. He started his career drawing war and Western comics for Spanish publishers. After two years he was approached by two British comics publishing giants, and began working for Fleetway and DC Thomson in 1972. For the former he contributed to such romance titles as Valentine and Mirabelle while most of his output for DCT was on a variety of strips for The Wizard. He also worked on Top Sellers’ Pocket Western Library. In 1975 he moved on to IPC, specifically to Battle Picture Weekly, where he worked on a variety of strips, most notably Rat Pack and Major Eazy. Two years later he designed not only Judge Dredd but also the look of Mega-City One, the setting for the iconic Lawman of the Future’s stories, for 2000 AD. However the Spanish artist only illustrated Dredd’s historic first appearance (in Prog 2) and one other story before returning to Battle for the short-lived El Mestizo. From there he moved on to a new IPC weekly. For Starlord, which launched in 1978, he conceived Strontium Dog in collaboration with T.B. Grover (a pseudonym for writers John Wagner – with whom he co-created Judge Dredd – and Alan Grant). Before the year was out Starlord was merged with 2000 AD with the Grover/Ezquerra team migrating their mutant bounty hunter to the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. In 1982, Ezquerra, who drew virtually every one of Strontium Dog’s appearances until 1988, reunited with Wagner and Dredd for the classic Apocalypse War, a seven-month long epic which he illustrated in its entirety. He has continued to draw the Lawman of the Future’s exploits periodically ever since either in 2000 AD or its monthly companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine. He also worked with 2000 AD founder Pat Mills, with whom he conceived The Third World War, which ran in Crisis, 2000 AD’s politically themed companion title, from its launch in 1988. Ezquerra’s US debut came in 1995. The Spanish artist, who also co-created Fiends of the Easter Front [1980] and Durham Red [1991] for 2000 AD as well as drawing the weekly’s adaptations of Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat novels [beginning in 1979], drew DC’s Grant/Wagner-written Bob, the Galactic Bum four-parter. That was followed later in the year by a DC one-shot, Lobo: I Quit, and then in 1996 by the Garth Ennis-written Bloody Mary four-parter for Helix, DC’s short-lived science fiction imprint. The Spanish artist, who also co-created The Bad Man [1992] for the Megazine and Al’s Baby [1997] for 2000 AD, has never really slackened when it comes to contributing to the two British titles. His work for American publishers has, however, been more sporadic. Collaborating more often than not with Ennis, the Spanish artist’s US credits have included a 1997 Bloody Mary sequel and – for Vertigo (DC’s mature readers imprint) – 1997’s Preacher Special: The Good Old Boys and 2000’s four-issue Adventures of the Rifle Brigade and its 2001 sequel. Across the same period he also drew two Star Wars comics: 1997’s Bobba Fett #½ (for Wizard) and Dark Horse’s six-issue Mara Jade the following year. Those – unlike Black Bull Comics five-issue Just a Pilgrim [2001], its 2002 sequel and Vertigo’s 2003 one-shot, War Story: Condors –weren’t written by Ennis. With his 2000 AD/Megazine work continuing apace (primarily in partnership with Wagner), in 2005 Ezquerra illustrated The Authority: The Magnificent Kevin, a five-parter published by DC’s WildStorm imprint. That was written by Ennis as was the remainder of his US work: 2006’s A Man called Kev (another DC/WildStorm five-parter) and Battlefields: The Tankies, a three-parter published by Dynamite in 2009. After brief runs on DC/WildStorm’s Ennis-written The Boys [2009] and Dynamite’s 2010 and 2012 Battlefields series, Ezquerra eased back on his workload, restricting himself to 2000 AD and the Megazine, remaining a regular contributor to both to this day.
  8. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Wagner Writer: Star Wars; 2000 AD; A History of Violence LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD (where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic), John Wagner set out to be a professional writer some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, a fellow writer who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagner began changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner – who wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 as well – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunched Eagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine since 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics and The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels. In addition they collaborated on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profile Batman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but were published sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagner went on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – and the 12 issues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it in 1994 – on his own. Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much preferring the British approach, Wagner all-but cut his ties with US publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett (1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs from The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint). He wound up his American venture at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess (1999). Since then Wagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 2003 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus (co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has inspired many who have followed in his footsteps. He continues to be an inspiration to countless aspiring writers.
  9. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Wagner Attending: Saturday & Sunday Writer: Star Wars; 2000 AD; A History of Violence LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD (where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic), John Wagner set out to be a professional writer some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, a fellow writer who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagner began changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner – who wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 as well – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunched Eagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine since 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics and The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels. In addition they collaborated on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profile Batman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but were published sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagner went on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – and the 12 issues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it in 1994 – on his own. Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much preferring the British approach, Wagner all-but cut his ties with US publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett (1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs from The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint). He wound up his American venture at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess (1999). Since then Wagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 2003 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus (co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has inspired many who have followed in his footsteps. He continues to be an inspiration to countless aspiring writers.
  10. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mike Collins Attending: Saturday & Sunday Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars ACROSS a career that dates back to 1983, Mike Collins has pretty much drawn all the major superheroes for DC as well as quite a few for Marvel. The co-creator of Gambit (introduced in 1990’s Uncanny X-Men #266) made his professional debut illustrating a four-pager written by the soon-to-be-a-comicbook legend Alan Moore and published by Marvel UK in The Daredevils #8. Soon in demand as both a penciller and an inker, Collins contributed to various other titles – notably Transformers – for the House of Ideas’ British arm before adding 2000 AD to his growing CV. His first US work was for Eclipse where he drew strips for issues of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton in 1986. The following year he was hired by DC to draw New Teen Titans Annual #3, the first of a number of one-off assignments he fulfilled alongside his continuing work for various British comics, among them Doctor Who Magazine, a title with which he has remained closely associated ever since. In 1992 Collins launched Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, writing and drawing all 12 of its issues before moving on to pencil all but one of the final 21 issues of another DC comic, Darkstars. Come early 1998, the artist was involved with two new series: the five-part Star Trek: Untold and Babylon 5: In Valen’s Name, a three-parter on which he collaborated with J Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series. While much of his focus since the millennium has been outside the comics field, Collins – who has recently produced storyboards for BBC-TV’s Doctor Who series – continues to contribute to Doctor Who and 2000 AD as well as to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.
  11. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Wagner Writer: Star Wars; 2000 AD; A History of Violence LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD (where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic), John Wagner set out to be a professional writer some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, a fellow writer who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagner began changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner – who wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 as well – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunched Eagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine since 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics and The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels. In addition they collaborated on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profile Batman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but were published sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagner went on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – and the 12 issues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it in 1994 – on his own. Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much preferring the British approach, Wagner all-but cut his ties with US publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett (1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs from The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint). He wound up his American venture at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess (1999). Since then Wagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 2003 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus (co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has inspired many who have followed in his footsteps. He continues to be an inspiration to many.
  12. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Al Ewing Attending: Saturday and Sunday Writer: 2000 AD FOR ALMOST a decade beginning in 2002 Al Ewing contributed to 2000 AD and its Judge Dredd Megazine spin-off. Initially scripting standalone five-pagers he went on to write Judge Dredd, The Zaucer of Zilk, Damnation Station and Zombo among other series. Over the same period, Ewing, whose break into the US market came in 2011 when he was selected to succeed Garth Ennis on Dynamite's Jennifer Blood, was also supporting UK small press publishers; his work appearing in Solar Wind, FutureQuake and Zarjaz among other titles. In addition, in conjunction with artist P.J. Holden, he was responsible for 2009's Murderdrome, a pioneering yet controversial comic designed to be read on mobile phones. Simultaneously with Jennifer Blood, Ewing (who wrote 19 issues of that comic) was sanctioned to launch a spin-off from that Dynamite title. Premiering in 2012, The Ninjettes ran six issues. Come 2013, the writer, who continued to contribute to the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic and to the Megazine, was working for Marvel, where, after a couple of fill-ins, he authored the 13 issues of Iron Man: Fatal Frontier alongside the Mars Attacks Judge Dredd four-parter for IDW. Before the year was out Ewing was tasked with launching Mighty Avengers. He wrote all 14 issues of that series and currently scripts Captain America and the Mighty Avengers (the title that succeeded it) as well as Loki: Agent of Asgard and Titan's Doctor Who: The Eleventh Doctor, both of which he also premiered in 2014. The writer, who also scripted a 2014 Thor and Loki five-parter within Marvel's Original Sin saga, most recently produced Ultron Forever, a 2015 serial where each of the three episodes appeared as Avengers, New Avengers and Uncanny Avengers one-shots.
  13. Latest Guest Announcement - David Roach Attending: Saturday and Sunday Artist: 2000 AD; Batman/Demon Author: The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years; The Art of Jose Gonzales WELL known for his encyclopaedic knowledge of comics history and for his remarkable ability to identify the work of other comics artists, David Roach began his professional career drawing for 2000 AD. He worked on various strips for the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic between 1988 and 1992, when he made his US debut illustrating a 13-pager for issue #3 of Marvel’s creator-owned Epic anthology. Over the next three years he pencilled stories for both DC and Dark Horse contributing to such titles as Dark Horse Comics, Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi – Knights of the Old Republic, Darkstars and Lobo before drawing 1996’s Batman/Demon one-shot. Much in demand as an inker especially on Doctor Who Magazine, Roach’s next major project was Star Trek: Voyager – Avalon Rising, a 2000 one-shot for DC’s WildStorm imprint following which he renewed his association with 2000 AD. He remains an infrequent contributor to the UK SF weekly while now primarily working outside of comics; among other things he provides illustrations for role-playing game manuals and storyboards for films. The co-author of 2014's The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years for Dynamite (for which he also provides the occasional cover), Roach also contributes sporadically to 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine. Publication of his latest book, Dynamite's The Art of Jose Gonzalez, coincides with his appearance at Film and Comic Con Cardiff Winter 2015.
  14. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Andrew Wildman Attending: Friday, Saturday and Sunday Artist: Transformers; 2000 AD; Felicia Hardy: The Black Cat; G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero Like so many other British artists of his generation, Andrew Wildman began his professional career in the pages of 2000 AD; in 1987’s Prog 539. Within a year he’d migrated to Marvel UK where he contributed to such titles as Real Ghostbusters, Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers, Incredible Hulk Presents and Slimer but it was on Transformers that he was to really make his mark. His initial three-year association with the comicbook adventures of Hasbro’s Robots in Disguise continued until 1992 and included a run on the US version of the title. Transformers subsequently became a constant thread throughout his career. He reunited with acclaimed Transformers writer Simon Furman for Transformers: Regeneration, a 2012 IDW series that continued and wrapped up the story left unfinished when Marvel (US) cancelled its Transformers comic in 1991. It concluded in 2014. Wildman includes Felicia Hardy: The Black Cat, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, Mission: Impossible, Venom: Carnage Unleashed and X-Men Adventures among his many credits. The artist, who made his US debut in 1989 with G.I. Joe European Missions #10, is the founder of Draw the World Together, a charity that raises funds to benefit street children around the world and create healthcare and education possibilities. Frontier, a strip he drew in 2009 for the now-defunct DFC was collected in a hardcover edition subtitled Dealing with Demons by Print Media Productions in 2012. These days Wildman spends much of his time working in television and on computer games.
  15. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - David Roach Attending: Friday, Saturday and Sunday Artist: 2000 AD; Batman/Demon WELL known for his encyclopaedic knowledge of comics history and for his remarkable ability to identify the work of other comics artists, David Roach began his professional career drawing for 2000 AD. He worked on various strips for the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic between 1988 and 1992, when he made his US debut illustrating a 13-page story for issue #3 of Marvel’s creator-owned Epic anthology. Over the next three years he pencilled for both DC and Dark Horse contributing to such titles as Dark Horse Comics, Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi – Knights of the Old Republic, Darkstars and Lobo before drawing 1996’s Batman/Demon one-shot. Much in demand as an inker especially on Doctor Who Magazine, Roach’s next major project was Star Trek: Voyager – Avalon Rising, a 2000 one-shot for DC’s WildStorm imprint following which he renewed his association with 2000 AD. He remains an infrequent contributor to the UK SF weekly while now primarily working outside of comics; among other things he provides illustrations for role-playing game manuals and storyboards for films. The co-author of 2014's The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years for Dynamite (for which he also provides the occasional cover), Roach also contributes sporadically to 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.
  16. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Richard Burton Attending: Saturday and Sunday Editor: Sonic the Comic; 2000 AD ANOTHER Brit whose years in fandom sequed into a long-lasting career in comics, Richard Burton was one of the powers behind Comic Media, one of the UK’s earliest fanzines, which premiered in 1971. From there he swiftly moved on to publish/edit the award-winning Comic Media News before taking an editorial position at Marvel UK in 1978. Two years later Burton – who co-founded the prestigious Eagle Awards in 1976 – wound up CMN after 40 issues. Virtually simultaneously he migrated to Fleetway becoming assistant editor on 2000 AD, where he was immortalised as BURT, an editorial droid first seen in 1981’s Prog 198. Absent from the title from 1984 to 1986 while he worked on other comics and magazines, Burton returned to the weekly in 1987. With Prog 520 he was elevated to editor of the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. Assuming the weekly’s traditional Tharg the Mighty identity, he remained at the helm until 1994 leaving after Prog 872 to focus on Sonic the Comic, the title he had launched the previous year for Egmont, which had acquired 2000 AD in 1991. Although he continues to write about comics, two years later he left the medium itself entirely to concentrate on other publishing arenas.
  17. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Steve Yeowell Attending: Friday, Saturday and Sunday Artist: Zenith; 2000 AD; Skrull Kill Krew MUCH admired for his collaboration on Zenith, 2000 AD's mould-breaking superhero saga with Grant Morrison, artist Steve Yeowell first came in contact with the acclaimed Scots writer virtually at the start of his career. Mere months after making his debut at Harrier Comics in 1986 (on Swiftsure & Conqueror), Yeowell moved to Marvel UK where he teamed up with Morrison for a 10-issue run on Spider-Man and Zoidswhich the artist followed with a handful of issues of Thundercats and Action Force (the British version of G.I. Joe). Then Morrison handpicked him for Zenith, which he drew from 1987 to 1992. In parallel he illustrated other stories for 2000 AD, with which he has remained continuously associated ever since. Yeowell's first US work was a contribution to the 1989 first issue of Open Space, Marvel's SF anthology, with the 67 Seconds graphic novel for the House of Ideas' creator-owned imprint following in 1992. Sandwiched in between was the Morrison-written The New Adventures of Hitler. That ran in Crisis, 2000 AD's politically aware companion title, just months before Yeowell began his 14 years (and counting) association with Judge Dredd Megazine, the prime spin-off from 2000 AD. Two years later he reunited with Morrison for the three-issue Sebastian O for Vertigo's DC's embryonic mature readers imprint for which he also illustrated the first four issues of 1994's Morrison-scripted The Invisibles​. The following year came Skrull Kill Krew, a Marvel five-parter co-authored by Morrison and fellow Scot Mark Millar, with whom the artist had also worked at 2000 AD. Since then Yeowell has been a virtually permanent contributor to the weekly SF anthology and/or the Megazine although he has found time for sporadic returns to the US audience. Primarily his output has been fill-ins, annuals and the like but he did also draw a 2002 Foot Soldiers graphic novel for AiT/Planet Lar and couple more short runs on The Invisibles​.
  18. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Wagner Attending: Saturday and Sunday Writer: 2000 AD; A History of Violence LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD, where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic. John Wagner's career dates back to some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagnerbegan changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner– who also wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floorfor Scream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunchedEagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazinesince 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics, The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels as well as on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profile Batman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but werepublished sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagnerwent on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – an d t he 12 iss ues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it i n 1994 – on his own . Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much prefer r ing the Brit ish approach, Wagne r all-but cut his t ies with U S publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett(1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs fro m The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint) before winding up at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess ( 1999). Since thenWagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 ADand Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 1993 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus(co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has inspired many who have followed in his footsteps. He continues to be an inspiration to many.​
  19. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Matt Brooker Attending: Saturday and Sunday MATT BROOKER Artist: 2000 AD; War of the Worlds; Kingdom of the Wicked OFTEN credited as D'Israeli and occasionally D'Israeli D'Emon D'Raughtsman, Brooker has been drawing comics professionally since 1988. His early work appeared in such titles as Mister X, Crisis, Hellblazer and The Sandman. as well as Deadline. For the latter title he co-created Lazarus Churchyard with writer Warren Ellis whom he also partnered on Metalscream stories in 1994 for Marvel's 2099 Unlimited comic. Although he has numerous DC and Marvel credits, much of his subsequent work has been for 2000 AD and in collaboration with writer Ian Edginton, with whom he first worked on Revolver in 1992. Since 1998 he has been a regular contributor to the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic and its companion title Judge Dredd Megazine where his major projects have included Scarlet Traces (a follow up of sorts to H .G. Well s' War of the Worlds , which he an d Edginton adapted f or D ark Horse in 20 04), Leviathan , Stickleback a nd – with writer Rob Williams – Low Life and Ordinary . He a l so drew Kingdom of the Wicked , an Edginton-writ te n four-part e r for Caliber i n 1996 , a n d the four-issue Great Game , Dark Horse's 2006 sequel to Scarlet Traces .
  20. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Reppion Appearing: Saturday Writer: Damsels; 2000 AD; Albion; Wild Girl WILD Girl was where John Reppion's comicbook career began. A six-issue collaboration with his wife Leah Moore, the 2005 mini for DC's WildStorm imprint was followed later the same year by Albion, another WildStorm six-parter on which they collaborated with Moore's father, the legendary comicbook writer Alan Moore. Since then they have been a permanent writing partnership. First, after brief detour to contribute to The Dark Horse Book of Monsters and to first issue of Th3rd World Studios' Space Doubles anthology, they authored three four-parters – Witchblade: Shades of Grey for Image/Top Cow and Dynamite's Raise the Dead in 2007 and The Darkness vs Eva: Daughter of Dracula the following year. With contributions to a variety of anthologies for various publishers along the way, in 2009 the duo authored IDW's Doctor Who: The Whispering Gallery one-shot and the five-issue Sherlock Holmes for Dynamite. More work for Dynamite followed as they established a reputation for Victorian--themed stories. First came two 2009 five-issue adaptations – The Complete Dracula and The Complete Alice in Wonderland – which were followed in 2010 by a four-part Raise the Dead sequel (co-written with Mike Raicht). Two years after that they embarked Damsels. Their first ongoing series, it was set in the world of fairy tales and featured the couple's interpretations of such characters as Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and the Little Mermaid. While continuing to contribute to anthologies, they also authored The Liverpool Demon, another Sherlock Holmes five-parter in 2012. Since Damsels (which ended in 2014 after 13 issues and one one-shot) they have produced their first work for 2000 AD. Launched in 2014, Black Shuck's first serial ran to nine episodes. http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/170/0/d/damsels_jsc_by_toolkitten-d543ueo.jpg
  21. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Leah Moore Appearing: Saturday Writer: Damsels; 2000 AD; Albion; Wild Girl Better known for her collaborations with her husband John Reppion, Leah Moore began her professional career writing solo, contributing stories to issues of a couple of series released by America's Best Comics, a DC/WilDstorm imprint set up especially to publish titles created by her legendary comics writing father, Alan. Her professional relationship with Reppion kicked off in 2005, when they collaborated on the six-issue Wild Girl for WildStorm. Moore and Reppion's second project was 2005's Albion, a DC/WildStorm six-parter on which they collaborated with Moore senior. Then, after brief detour to contribute to The Dark Horse Book of Monsters and to first issue of Th3rd World Studios' Space Doubles anthology, they authored three four-parters – Witchblade: Shades of Grey for Image/Top Cow and Dynamite's Raise the Dead in 2007 and The Darkness vs Eva: Daughter of Dracula the following year. With contributions to a variety of anthologies for various publishers along the way, in 2009 the duo authored IDW's Doctor Who: The Whispering Gallery one-shot and the five-issue Sherlock Holmes for Dynamite. More work for Dynamite followed as they established a reputation for Victorian--themed stories. First came two 2009 five-issue adaptations – The Complete Dracula and The Complete Alice in Wonderland – which were followed in 2010 by a four-part Raise the Dead sequel (co-written with Mike Raicht). Two years after that they embarked Damsels. Their first ongoing series, it was set in the world of fairy tales and featured the couple's interpretations of such characters as Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and the Little Mermaid. While continuing to contribute to anthologies, they also authored The Liverpool Demon, another Sherlock Holmes five-parter in 2012. They followed Damsels (which ended in 2014 after 13 issues and one one-shot) with their first work for 2000 AD. Launched in 2014, Black Shuck's first serial ran to nine episodes. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BUxpuD6LJ-4/U8-n8-AWjTI/AAAAAAAAKX8/10gnGo23Fy0/s1600/The+BlackShuckFINAL.jpg
  22. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Andy Diggle Appearing: Fri/Sat/Sun Writer: The Losers, Daredevil, 2000 AD, Six Guns, Thunderbolts, Green Arrow: Year One TWO YEARS after joining the Judge Dredd Megazine editorial team, Andy Diggle formally became editor of the title as well as its long-running parent, 2000 AD. He remained in the post for two years, resigning to embark on a freelance writing career in 2002. His earliest stories appeared in 2000 AD but he was quickly headhunted by DC's mature readers imprint, Vertigo. A four-issue Hellblazer: Lady Constantine (2003) led to The Losers, which ran 32 issues until 2006. Both launched in 2003, the same year he collaborated with Judge Dredd co-creator John Wagner on the four issues of Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus for Dark Horse and a year before he relaunched Swamp Thing for Vertigo. After scripting that title's initial six-chapter serial Diggle moved on to his first overt excursion into the world of superheroes. An eight-parter for DC, Adam Strange​ was followed by 2005's six-issue Silent Dragon, a futuristic creator-owned title for DC's Wildstorm imprint after which the writer authored his first project for Marvel. A 2006 one-shot, Punisher: Silent Night was followed by the first six issues of DC's Batman Confidential and Gamekeeper – a five-parter co-written by filmmaker Guy Ritchie – for Virgin before he returned to Vertigo for 18-issues of Hellblazer alongside which he also scripted 2007's Green Arrow: Year One six-parter for DC Leaving Vertigo in 2009 Diggle moved to Marvel for what would be his most high profile series to date. He remained on Thunderbolts for only for 11 issues but his next move – to Daredevil – took his career to even greater heights. In between he authored Ratcatcher, a 2010 graphic novel for the newly established Vertigo Crime line, it indicated a new direction for Diggle, one that would infuse his Daredevil work. His 12-issue run on the title segued into Shadowland, a major 2010 five-parter that wrapped up the blind superhero's current title and which – along with the Diggle-written Daredevil: Reborn – laid the groundwork for a Daredevil relaunch. The writer followed that 2011 five-parter with another Marvel miniseries of the same length. Released in 2012, Six Guns was also more about crime than about bombastic superhero activities while Snapshot (which marked his return to Judge Dredd Megazine) was even more ground level. Next, however, came classic science fiction as IDW commissioned Diggle to relaunch BBC TV's iconic Time Lord in an ongoing Doctor Who comic for the American market. But then it was back to crime as the regular writer of The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman's Image series Thief of Thieves and – after an abortive flirtation with DC's Action Comics – Uncanny, a six-part "paranormal thriller" for Dynamite's crime line. Currently scripting Thief of Thieves and the recently launched Uncanny Season 2, Diggle did step back into the world of superheroes in 2014 for Marvel's four-issue Captain America: Living Legend.
  23. Latest Guest Announcement - Andy Diggle Attending: Saturday and Sunday Writer: The Losers, Daredevil, 2000 AD, Six Guns, Thunderbolts, Green Arrow: Year One Writer: The Losers, Daredevil, 2000 AD, Six Guns, Thunderbolts, Green Arrow: Year One TWO YEARS after joining the Judge Dredd Megazine editorial team, Andy Diggle formally became editor of the title as well as its long-running parent, 2000 AD. He remained in the post for two years, resigning to embark on a freelance writing career in 2002. His earliest stories appeared in 2000 AD but he was quickly headhunted by DC's mature readers imprint, Vertigo. A four-issue Hellblazer: Lady Constantine (2003) led to The Losers, which ran 32 issues until 2006. Both launched in 2003, the same year he collaborated with Judge Dredd co-creator John Wagner on the four issues of Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus for Dark Horse and a year before he relaunched Swamp Thing for Vertigo. After scripting that title's initial six-chapter serial Diggle moved on to his first overt excursion into the world of superheroes. An eight-parter for DC, Adam Strange​ was followed by 2005's six-issue Silent Dragon, a futuristic creator-owned title for DC's Wildstorm imprint after which the writer authored his first project for Marvel. A 2006 one-shot, Punisher: Silent Night was followed by the first six issues of DC's Batman Confidential and Gamekeeper – a five-parter co-written by filmmaker Guy Ritchie – for Virgin before he returned to Vertigo for 18-issues of Hellblazer alongside which he also scripted 2007's Green Arrow: Year One six-parter for DC Leaving Vertigo in 2009 Diggle moved to Marvel for what would be his most high profile series to date. He remained on Thunderbolts for only for 11 issues but his next move – to Daredevil – took his career to even greater heights. In between he authored Ratcatcher, a 2010 graphic novel for the newly established Vertigo Crime line, it indicated a new direction for Diggle, one that would infuse his Daredevil work. His 12-issue run on the title segued into Shadowland, a major 2010 five-parter that wrapped up the blind superhero's current title and which – along with the Diggle-written Daredevil: Reborn – laid the groundwork for a Daredevil relaunch. The writer followed that 2011 five-parter with another Marvel miniseries of the same length. Released in 2012, Six Guns was also more about crime than about bombastic superhero activities while Snapshot (which marked his return to Judge Dredd Megazine) was even more ground level. Next, however, came classic science fiction as IDW commissioned Diggle to relaunch BBC TV's iconic Time Lord in an ongoing Doctor Who comic for the American market. But then it was back to crime as the regular writer of The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman's Image series Thief of Thieves and – after an abortive flirtation with DC's Action Comics – Uncanny, a six-part "paranormal thriller" for Dynamite's crime line. Currently scripting Thief of Thieves and the recently launched Uncanny Season 2, Diggle did step back into the world of superheroes in 2014 for Marvel's four-issue Captain America: Living Legend.
  24. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Dylan Teague Artist: 2000 AD 2000 AD runs like a thread through Dylan Teague's professional credits. Beginning his career contributing to the UK SF weekly in 1997, the artist’s work continues to feature regularly in the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic and its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine for which he has been working almost as long. Although he made his US debut pencilling an 10-page story for the 1998 first issue of DC’s Batman 80-Page Giant #1,Teague has chosen to concentrate on the British market where he is a sought after inker and colourist. In the past few years, his work has also been seen in such titles as Marvel Rampage, Doctor Who Magazine and Spectacular Spider-Man Adventures.
  25. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Lee Townsend Attending: Sat/Sun Artist: 2000 AD Probably best-known for his contributions to such 2000 AD strips as Bison, Synammon and Breathing Space, Townsend began his comics career in 2000 providing inks to the last three issues of Gary Frank’s Image/Top Cow six-parter, Kin. The artist, who had a brief stint working in animation for Dreamworks and Disney, has since provided finishes for a variety of titles, Judge Dredd Megazine, Marvel Heroes, Marvel Rampage, Transformers: Armada and Panini UK’s Spider-Man among them. He has been inking Crossed: With You were Here for Avatar Press since 2012. http://www.leetownsendart.com/uploads/1/8/8/6/18865708/s552160190433861406_p51_i1_w2500.jpeg
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