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Found 49 results

  1. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - LEE TOWNSEND Artist: 2000 AD Attending Saturday & Sunday PROBABLY best-known for his contributions to such 2000 AD strips as Bison,Synammon and Breathing Space, Lee Townsend began his comics career in 2000 providing inks to the last three issues of Gary Frank’s Image/Top Cow six-parter, Kin. The artist, who had a brief stint working in animation for Dreamworks and Disney, has since provided finishes for a variety of titles, Judge Dredd Megazine, Marvel Heroes, Marvel Rampage, Transformers: Armada and Panini UK’s Spider-Manamong them. The inker of Avatar Press’s Crossed: Wish You were Here between 2012 and 2014, Townsend also contributed to Spider-Man Annual 2015 for Panini and made a fleeting 2015 return to 2000 AD’s companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine after more than a decade. Following that Townsend illustrated a 10-issue run on The Official Ben 10 Magazinefor Egmont. These days, however, he spends most of his time producing storyboards for advertising and character designs for the Cartoon Network.
  2. Artist/writer: Watchmen; Secret Service; The Originals; Give me Liberty; 2000 AD Attending: Sunday Afternoon APPOINTED Britain's first Comics Laureate in 2014, Dave Gibbons is internationally acclaimed as the creator – with writer Alan Moore – of DC’s groundbreaking 1986 series, Watchmen. An alumnus of the UK’s fanzine scene, his first work appearing in Fantasy Advertiser in 1970 with contributions to such underground comics as The Trials of Nasty Comics and cOZmic Comics following over the next couple of years, the artist very quickly graduated to professional assignments. He worked on a variety of D.C. Thomson and IPC weeklies, among them The Hotspur, The Wizard andBuster, through the Bardon Press Features agency. He also drew a black superhero comic for the emerging Nigerian market. No connection with the similarly titled Marvel series, the short-lived Powerman premiered in 1975, the same year he contributed a six-pager to Marvel’s Giant-Size Chillers #1; his first US comics work, it was also to be his last for seven years. Two years later Gibbons joined the creative team for the launch of 2000 AD, a weekly anthology through which he was to establish his reputation. Initially drawing Harlem Heroes for the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic, he went on to illustrate Ro-Busters, Judge Dredd and Rogue Trooper, as well as a reinvention of Britain’s iconic 1950s SF hero, Dan Dare. Moving over to Marvel UK in 1979, he drew the lead strips in Doctor Who Weekly and Hulk Comic. By 1982 Gibbons – who had seen some of his (mainly Doctor Who) Marvel UK work reprinted in America by the House of Ideas – had a well-earned reputation as one of the leading artists in British comics. Headhunted by DC editor Len Wein, he made a second, far more successful and long-lasting foray into the US market, at first drawing backups in The Flash and Green Lantern. Swiftly moving on to the lead feature in the latter, he also illustrated 1983’s landmark Brave and the Bold #200 and the classic For the Man who has Everything…. Written by Moore, with whom he had also worked on 2000 AD, it ran in 1985’s Superman Annual #11 and was a precursor of things to come from the duo. Premiering the following year, the Moore-written Watchmen launched the careers of its already acclaimed creators into the stratosphere. A huge commercial success, it garnered critical praise from not only the comics industry but also (and more importantly) the mainstream media. Now much in demand as a cover artist, Gibbons made his return to Marvel in 1988 with a Doctor Strange 20-pager in Marvel Fanfare #41 but the artist’s next major project was for Dark Horse. Teaming up with another industry legend, Batman: The Dark Knight Returns creator Frank Miller, he launched Give me Liberty. The 1990 four-parter kicked off the writer/artist team’s futuristic multi-chapter saga of Martha Washington, which only reached its conclusion in 2007. Having previously dabbled with writing, in 1989 he revamped Rogue Trooper for 2000 AD. He followed this by penning DC’s four-issue World’s Finest in 1990 and the following year’s Batman vs Predator four-parter for Dark Horse. His other scripting credits include 1995’s Superman: Kal one-shot, the 1996 and 1997 Super Soldier one-offs – which he also drew – for Amalgam (a DC/Marvel collaboration) and four 2003-4 issues of Captain America for Marvel. Since then Gibbons’ DC writing credits have included 2005’s The Rann/Thanagar War six-parter and the five issues of Green Lantern Corps: Recharge. Co-written with Geoff Johns, that 2005 mini set the scene for the following year's Green Lantern Corps for which Gibbons authored all but three of the first 17 issues while also scripting the five issues of Thunderbolt Jaxon for DC’s WildStorm imprint. Since 2007 Gibbons' comics output has been primarily limited to covers. He has, however, written a number of stories, among them Kamandi, the Last Boy on Earth, which DC serialised across the 12 issues of 2009's Wednesday Comics On the sequential art side, since the millennium, Gibbons has drawn various one-offs including 2001’s Just Imagine Stan Lee with Dave Gibbons Creating Green Lantern for DC and the following year’s War Stories: Screaming Eagles for DC/Vertigo. More significantly he drew and wrote The Originals, a futuristic 2004 graphic novel, for Vertigo, DC’s mature readers imprint. A year later he contributed to iBooks' Stan Lee's Alexa going on to produce Broken Sword: Shadow of the Templars, a 2009 promotional one-shot. That was for Revolution Software for which he subsequently created Broken Sword: The Smoking Mirror (2010) and Broken Sword 5: The Serpent's Curse (2014). In between he illustrated a six-parter for Marvel's creator-owned Icon imprint. Published in 2012, the Mark Miller/Matthew Vaughn-written Secret Service is Gibbons' most significant high profile project in recent years although he spearheaded Treatment, which launched from the online Madefire platform the same year. Despite the dearth of new work from him, Gibbons remains an iconic inspiration to comics creators and those with aspirations to break into the industry on both sides of the Atlantic.
  3. 2000 AD publisher Rebellion has kindly given permission for the Judge Minty movie to be screened at this year’s London Film and Comic Con. The authorised fan film (which runs 27 minutes) is set in Mega City One, the futuristic setting created by John Wagner and artist Carlos Ezquerra. It focuses on Minty, an aging Judge who decides to retire. As required by the Law, he must take the Long Walk out into the Cursed Earth, a wasteland teeming with mutants, savage gangs and beasts where anarchy holds sway. Directed by Steven Sterlacchini, the film stars Edmund Dehn as the titular lawmaker. Screening will be on the Comic Zone stage at noon on Friday, 2:00pm on Saturday and 5:00pm on Sunday. Entrance is free. As a bonus Rebellion has authorised an exclusive first look at Strontium Dog, a film by the same team and featuring another of 2000 AD’s stars created by Wagne5r and Ezquerra. The 30 second teaser can be viewed at the end of each Judge Minty screening and on other occasions throughout the weekend.
  4. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Will Simpson Storyboard artist: Game of Thrones Attending: Saturday & Sunday FOUR years after contributing to the first three issues of Ximoc – a comiczine launched in 1980 by fans in his native Belfast – Will Simpson began his professional career, drawing Big Ben for Warrior. Work for 2000 AD, Toxic and a variety of Marvel UK titles swiftly followed until, in 1991, he was approached by DC/Vertigo to work on Hellblazer. Three years later, after a diversion to draw 1993’s Alien: Rogue four-parter for Dark Horse, he illustrated the first of three Vamps miniseries [1994, 1996 and 1998] for that DC mature readers imprint. As the millennium headed towards its end, Simpson – whose association with 2000 AD concluded in 2001 – began winding down his comics work and turning his focus towards the movie industry. The Game of Thrones storyboard artist since 2011, his screen credits also include Reign of Fire [2002], City of Ember [2008] and Your Highness [2011].
  5. SHOWMASTERS is delighted to play host to Dave Gibbons, the lauded talent behind such titles as Watchmen, Secret Service and The Originals. Appointed Britain’s Comics Laureate in 2014, Gibbons, whose numerous credits also include 2000 AD, Give me Liberty and Just Imagine Stan Lee with Dave Gibbons Creating Green Lantern, will be joining Karen Berger – Vertigo’s acclaimed former editor-in-chief – on stage on Sunday at 3:00pm for what is likely to be an entertaining and informative chat. Following the interview Gibbons will spend an hour signing for fans.
  6. TWO TITANS of British comics are to make their first joint appearance at London Film & Comic at Olympia over the weekend of July 29-31. Artist Carlos Ezquerra will be on hand on all three days with John Wagner, the writer with whom he created Judge Dredd and Strontium Dog, joining him on Saturday and Sunday. The legends of 2000 AD have worked in multiple genres with their credits appearing in numerous titles on both sides of the Atlantic. They are looking forward to meeting their legion of fans. Both will be happy to sign copies of their comics while Ezquerra will also be sketching.
  7. Artist: 2000 AD; Noble Causes: Family Secrets; Marvel Heroes Magazine Attending: Friday, Saturday & Sunday STARTING out, as many British creators do, on 2000 AD, Ian Richardson worked for the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic from 2001 into 2002. At that point he landed at Image, where he drew 2002's Noble Causes: Family Secrets, which took him into 2003. It was three years before the artist, a professional musician who is often lured away from the drawing board, next worked in comics, returning to 2000 AD to contribute to a flurry of issues. After that he became involved with Platinum's Cowboys & Aliens graphic novel before embarking on a long association with Marvel Heroes Magazine published in the UK by Panini. Outside of comics he was also providing artwork for G.I. Joe Collectors' Magazine. In 2015 Richardson, who is currently producing cover art for various Zenescope titles, illustrated a brace of issues of Halo: Escalation for Dark Horse.
  8. Artist: Loki: Agent of Asgard; Batgirl; 2000 AD HE MAY have started out in 2005 at AP Comics, where he illustrated and provided the covers for the four issues of Dark Mists but Lee Garbett swiftly graduated from the British indie publisher to drawing a four-chapter serial in 2000 AD. Subsequently contributing to a couple of 2007 issues of Judge Dredd Megazine – the spin-off from the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic – he moved on to make his US debut at DC's WildStorm imprint. There he drew The Highwaymen five-parter, moving on to a five-issue run on Midnighter in 2008 and more or less concurrently to the six-part DC/WS DreamWar. Next came a couple of 2009 issues of Batman for DC itself for which he then pencilled a five-part serial in The Outsiders. His major breakthrough followed later in the year, when he launched Batgirl, drawing a dozen of the title's first 14 issues. Garbett's next major project was a three-issue run on Spider-Man: Big Time. in 2011. His inaugural Marvel assignment, it led to a three-part in Amazing Spider-Manserial and then to the Amazing Spider-Man/Ghost Rider: Motorstorm one-shot. He rounded out the year with the four-chapter Fear Itself: The Deep. Other than four issues of Ghost Rider, the artist's time was then given over to fill-ins (for DC as well as Marvel) until late in 2012, when he migrated to Valiant. Initially he worked on X-0 Manowar, where he pencilled two four-issue runs with issues of Harbinger and Shadowman in between. In 2014 he returned to Marvel where he pencilled all but one of the 17 issues of Loki: Agent of Asgard while also drawing the five weekly issues of a Thor/Loki serial published as a sidebar to 2014's Original Sin event. Garbett is now back at DC or rather at Vertigo, its mature readers imprint, as the regular penciller on the recently launched Lucifer.
  9. Artist/designer: The Science Service; Dare; 2000 AD; Soho Dives, Soho Divas Attending: Saturday & Sunday MUCH in demand today as a designer, Rian Hughes began his comics career in 1983, producing his own small press minicomics before becoming a regular contributor to Escape Magazine, where his work continued to be featured until 1989. His first graphic novel, The Science Service was published in Belgium by Magic Strip in 1987 but by 1990 he was becoming well-known as a cover designer. Even so he continued to pursue his storytelling, most notably with the Grant Morrison-written Dare. A controversial reimagining of Dan Dare (the archetypal Pilot of the Future from the 1950s Eagle), the strip was serialised between 1990 and 1991 across the first seven issues of Revolver and Crisis #55-56. After it came a series of Tales from Beyond Science, which featured in various issues of 2000 AD between 1992 and 1994. Since then the artist has concentrated almost exclusively on his advertising work although his presence is still to be seen on the design of myriad comicbook covers and logos as well as a variety of lettering fonts. Hughes, whose impact on the look of the comics industry has been phenomenal, occasionally still returns to storytelling, contributing to such anthologies as Raymond Chandler’s Marlowe the Graphic Novel (iBooks; 2003), Project: Romantic(Adhouse Books; 2006) and Nelson (2011; Blank Slate Books). More recently he provided strips for 2014 issues of Batman: Black and White for DC and for DC/Vertigo's Vertigo Quarterly CMYK. Soho Dives, Soho Divas, a 2013 book of his illustrations, showcases the retro influence of much of Hughes' art. However, he is also an innovator as exemplified byOn the Line. The pioneering strip, which he created using Adobe Illustrator, ran inThe Guardian newspaper for two years from 2005.
  10. Artist: Iron Man; 2000 AD; Warhammer Monthly Attending: Saturday & Sunday Three years after a brief flirtation with the then still extant underground comics scene (he wrote and illustrated a contribution to 1981’s Knockabout Comics #3) Kev Hopgood resurfaced drawing mainstream comics. Like many of his peers the British artist contributed to 2000 AD (for which he worked on and off until 1995) but also illustrated stories for Marvel UK where his art graced the pages of Spider-Man and Zoids as well as such titles as Mighty World of Marvel, Thundercats, Action Force and Doctor Who. Hopgood made his US debut in 1988 with issue #4 of G.I. Joe European Missions,continuing to contribute to that Marvel title until the following year. Marvel US came calling again in 1992 at which time he became the regular penciller on Iron Man. He stayed on that series for just over two years during which time he co-created War Machine. Stories for the Warhammer Monthly anthology (published by Games Workshop’s Black Library imprint for which he also drew three Darkblade graphic novels) followed but by 2000 he was all-but out of comics. He resurfaced in 2008 to draw two Warhammer 40,000 minis for BOOM! Studios but then chose to concentrate on illustrating children's books and educational books. That was until 2014, when he contributed briefly to 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine​.
  11. Writer/editor: Resident Alien; Terra Obscura; 2000 AD; The Sandman Presents: Love Street; Captain America/Nick Fury: The Otherworld War Attending: Saturday Only AFTER working for The Who's Pete Townsend as commissioning editor for Eel Pie Publishing, Peter Hogan wound up at Quality Comics, where he served as an editor on the UK-based label's line of 2000 AD reprints aimed at the US market. That was during the mid-to-late '80s after which he moved on to Fleetway. There, after working on 1989's 2000 AD Winter Special, he became editor ofRevolver, editing all seven issues of the experimental title as well as the two specials the 1990 comic spawned. Two years later, Hogan (who had also been working as a music journalist) began writing scripts for 2000 AD with his first stories appearing2000 AD Sci-Fi Special 1992 and 2000 AD Action Special before he began contributing to the self-styled Galaxy's Great Comic itself. Debuting on Prog 793, he wrote regularly for the weekly anthology until late 1995. In 1996 he was hired by Vertigo (DC's mature readers imprint) to write a four-issue run on The Dreaming. After a smattering of other issues of that title Hogan embarked on 1999's The Sandman Presents: Love Street before authoring his one and only Marvel project, the Captain America/Nick Fury: The Otherworld War one-shot, two years later. Subsequently he was brought in by Alan Moore to contribute to the famed British writer's America's Best Comics line, which was published by DC under its Wildstorm umbrella. Hogan scripted two Terra Obscura six-parters (in 2003 and 2004) as well as the six issues of 2010's Tom Strong and the Robots of Doom and of 2013'sTom Strong and the Planet of Peril. In 2011, after a three-part prelude in the Dark Horse Presents anthology. the writer unveiled Resident Alien, a 2012 three-parter. Two further three-issue DHP serials followed, the first leading into 2013's Resident Alien: The Suicide Blonde three-parter and the second a prelude to the three issues of Resident Alien: The Sam Hain Mystery which came along two years later. Hogan's most recent project is The King's Road, a 2016 three-parter that began life as a three-issue DHP serial three years before.
  12. JOHN WAGNER Writer: Star Wars; 2000 AD; A History of Violence Attending: Friday, Saturday & Sunday LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD(where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic), John Wagner set out to be a professional writer some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, a fellow writer who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagner began changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner – who wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 as well – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floor forScream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunched Eagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine since 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics and The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels. In addition they collaborated on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profileBatman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but were published sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagner went on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – and the 12 issues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it in 1994 – on his own. Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much preferring the British approach, Wagner all-but cut his ties with US publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett (1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs from The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint). He wound up his American venture at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess (1999). Since then Wagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 2003 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus (co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has motivated many who have followed in his footsteps. Willing to support the UK small press (as with Black Hearted Press’s recently launched Rok of the Reds), Wagner continues to be an inspiration to countless aspiring writers.
  13. KEV HOPGOOD Artist: Iron Man; 2000 AD; Warhammer Monthly Three years after a brief flirtation with the then still extant underground comics scene (he wrote and illustrated a contribution to 1981’s Knockabout Comics #3) Kev Hopgood resurfaced drawing mainstream comics. Like many of his peers the British artist contributed to 2000 AD (for which he worked on and off until 1995) but also illustrated stories for Marvel UK where his art graced the pages of Spider-Man and Zoids as well as such titles as Mighty World of Marvel, Thundercats, Action Force and Doctor Who. Hopgood made his US debut in 1988 with issue #4 of G.I. Joe European Missions,continuing to contribute to that Marvel title until the following year. Marvel US came calling again in 1992 at which time he became the regular penciller on Iron Man. He stayed on that series for just over two years during which time he co-created War Machine. Stories for the Warhammer Monthly anthology (published by Games Workshop’s Black Library imprint for which he also drew three Darkblade graphic novels) followed but by 2000 he was all-but out of comics. He resurfaced in 2008 to draw two Warhammer 40,000 minis for BOOM! Studios but then chose to concentrate on illustrating children's books and educational books. That was until 2014, when he contributed briefly to 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine​.
  14. IAN RICHARDSON Artist: 2000 AD; Noble Causes: Family Secrets; Marvel Heroes Magazine STARTING out, as many British creators do, on 2000 AD, Ian Richardson worked for the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic from 2001 into 2002. At that point he landed at Image, where he drew 2002's Noble Causes: Family Secrets, which took him into 2003. It was three years before the artist, a professional musician who is often lured away from the drawing board, next worked in comics, returning to 2000 AD to contribute to a flurry of issues. After that he became involved with Platinum's Cowboys & Aliens graphic novel before embarking on a long association with Marvel Heroes Magazine published in the UK by Panini. Outside of comics he was also providing artwork for G.I. Joe Collectors' Magazine. In 2015 Richardson, who is currently producing cover art for various Zenescope titles, illustrated a brace of issues of Halo: Escalation for Dark Horse.
  15. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Paul Davidson Attending: Saturday and Sunday Artist: Magneto; X-Club; 2000 AD; Warhammer Monthly; IT ALL began with Warhammer Monthly in 1998 for Paul Davidson, who contributed to four issues of the Games Workshop comic before leaving the medium for life as a storyboard/concept artist in the video games industry. When he resurfaced it was at Marvel, where his first work was a 2008 Nova cover and a fill-in on an issue of Dark X-Men: The Beginning. That pretty much set the pattern for Davidson's output at the House of Ideas with his art appearing in a number of titles across the next three years, New Mutants, X-Men, X-Men: Blind Science and Age of X among them. In 2011 the artist made his debut on 2000 AD although it would be another two years before he would make a significant contribution to the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic and not until 2014 that his work would begin to appear albeit sporadically in 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine. Across that same period he was still providing art to Marvel, most notably on 2012's five-part X-Club and the two issues of 2014's Inhumanity: Awakening but also for X-Factor and X-Men: Legacy. Davidson is currently drawing Magneto, on which he became regular artist in 2015.
  16. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Lee Townsend Attending: Saturday and Sunday Artist: 2000 AD Probably best-known for his contributions to such 2000 AD strips as Bison, Synammon and Breathing Space, Townsend began his comics career in 2000 providing inks to the last three issues of Gary Frank’s Image/Top Cow six-parter, Kin. The artist, who had a brief stint working in animation for Dreamworks and Disney, has since provided finishes for a variety of titles, Judge Dredd Megazine, Marvel Heroes, Marvel Rampage, Transformers: Armada and Panini UK’s Spider-Man among them. The inker of Avatar Press’s Crossed: Wish You were Here between 2012 and 2014, Townsend also contributed to Spider-Man Annual 2015 for Panini and most recently made a return to 2000 AD’s companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine after more than a decade.
  17. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mike Collins Attending: Saturday and Sunday Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars ACROSS a career that dates back to 1983, Mike Collins has pretty much drawn all the major superheroes for DC as well as quite a few for Marvel. The co-creator of Gambit (introduced in 1990’s Uncanny X-Men #266) made his professional debut illustrating a four-pager written by the soon-to-be-a-comicbook legend Alan Moore published by Marvel UK in The Daredevils #8. Soon in demand as both a penciller and an inker, Collins contributed to various other titles – notably Transformers – for the House of Ideas’ British arm before adding 2000 AD to his growing CV. His first US work was for Eclipse where he drew strips for issues of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton in 1986. The following year he was hired by DC to draw New Teen Titans Annual #3, the first of a number of one-off assignments he fulfilled alongside his continuing work for various British comics, among them Doctor Who Magazine, a title with which he has remained closely associated ever since. In 1992 Collins launched Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, writing and drawing all 12 of its issues before moving on to pencil all but one of the final 21 issues of another DC comic, Darkstars. Come early 1998, the artist was involved with two new series: Star Trek: Untold Voyages (aborted after just five issues) and Babylon 5: In Valen’s Name, a three-parter on which he collaborated with J Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series. While much of his focus since the millennium has been outside the comics field, Collins – who has recently produced storyboards for BBC-TV’s Doctor Who series – continues to contribute to Doctor Who and 2000 AD as well as to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.
  18. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Robbie Morrison Appearing: Sat/Sun Writer: 2000 AD; Judge Dredd Megazine JUDGE Dredd: The Megazine is the foundation of Robbie Morrison's career. After contributing to the 2000 AD spin-off for two years beginning in 1992 he commenced writing for the core weekly – the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comics – while also making his US debut with a three-episode 1994 serial in Dark Horse's flagship anthology, Dark Horse Presents. The writer, who maintains a close relationship with 2000 AD and the retitled Judge Dredd Megazine to this day, is the co-creator of such characters as Shakara, Shimura and Nikolai Dante, which many consider to be his signature creation. Although he now only works occasionally in the American market Morrison has authored some significant works, primarily for DC/WildStorm. Among them are The Authority [2003] and Wildcats: Nemesis [2005] although he did also script 2011's Deus Ex six-parter for DC itself. Currently writing Doctor Who: The Twelfth Doctor for Titan, Morrison also works on more personal projects, specificially White Death – initially released by Les Cartoonistes Dangereux in 1998 – and Drowntown, the 2013 first chapter in a Jonathan Cape graphic novel trilogy. Outside of comics Morrison spends much of his time writing for film, TV, animation and computer games.
  19. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mike Collins Appearing: Fri/Sat/Sun Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars ACROSS a career that dates back to 1983, Mike Collins has pretty much drawn all the major superheroes for DC as well as quite a few for Marvel. The co-creator of Gambit (introduced in 1990’s Uncanny X-Men #266) made his professional debut illustrating a four-pager written by the soon-to-be-a-comicbook legend Alan Moore published by Marvel UK in The Daredevils #8. Soon in demand as both a penciller and an inker, Collins contributed to various other titles – notably Transformers – for the House of Ideas’ British arm before adding 2000 AD to his growing CV. His first US work was for Eclipse where he drew strips for issues of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton in 1986. The following year he was hired by DC to draw New Teen Titans Annual #3, the first of a number of one-off assignments he fulfilled alongside his continuing work for various British comics, among them Doctor Who Magazine, a title with which he has remained closely associated ever since. In 1992 Collins launched Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, writing and drawing all 12 of its issues before moving on to pencil all but one of the final 21 issues of another DC comic, Darkstars. Come early 1998, the artist was involved with two new series: Star Trek: Untold Voyages (aborted after just five issues) and Babylon 5: In Valen’s Name, a three-parter on which he collaborated with J Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series. While much of his focus since the millennium has been outside the comics field, Collins – who has recently produced storyboards for BBC-TV’s Doctor Who series – continues to contribute to Doctor Who and 2000 AD as well as to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.​ http://www.freakhousegraphics.com/2000ad​
  20. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mike Collins Appearing: Sat/Sun Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars ACROSS a career that dates back to 1983, Mike Collins has pretty much drawn all the major superheroes for DC as well as quite a few for Marvel. The co-creator of Gambit (introduced in 1990’s Uncanny X-Men #266) made his professional debut illustrating a four-pager written by the soon-to-be-a-comicbook legend Alan Moore published by Marvel UK in The Daredevils #8. Soon in demand as both a penciller and an inker, Collins contributed to various other titles – notably Transformers – for the House of Ideas’ British arm before adding 2000 AD to his growing CV. His first US work was for Eclipse where he drew strips for issues of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton in 1986. The following year he was hired by DC to draw New Teen Titans Annual #3, the first of a number of one-off assignments he fulfilled alongside his continuing work for various British comics, among them Doctor Who Magazine, a title with which he has remained closely associated ever since. In 1992 Collins launched Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, writing and drawing all 12 of its issues before moving on to pencil all but one of the final 21 issues of another DC comic, Darkstars. Come early 1998, the artist was involved with two new series: Star Trek: Untold Voyages (aborted after just five issues) and Babylon 5: In Valen’s Name, a three-parter on which he collaborated with J Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series. While much of his focus since the millennium has been outside the comics field, Collins – who has recently produced storyboards for BBC-TV’s Doctor Who series – continues to contribute to Doctor Who and 2000 AD as well as to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.​ http://www.freakhousegraphics.com/2000ad​
  21. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Mike Collins Attending: Saturday and Sunday Artist: Doctor Who; 2000 AD; Darkstars ACROSS a career that dates back to 1983, Mike Collins has pretty much drawn all the major superheroes for DC as well as quite a few for Marvel. The co-creator of Gambit (introduced in 1990’s Uncanny X-Men #266) made his professional debut illustrating a four-pager written by the soon-to-be-a-comicbook legend Alan Moore published by Marvel UK in The Daredevils #8. Soon in demand as both a penciller and an inker, Collins contributed to various other titles – notably Transformers – for the House of Ideas’ British arm before adding 2000 AD to his growing CV. His first US work was for Eclipse where he drew strips for issues of Laser Eraser and Pressbutton in 1986. The following year he was hired by DC to draw New Teen Titans Annual #3, the first of a number of one-off assignments he fulfilled alongside his continuing work for various British comics, among them Doctor Who Magazine, a title with which he has remained closely associated ever since. In 1992 Collins launched Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, writing and drawing all 12 of its issues before moving on to pencil all but one of the final 21 issues of another DC comic, Darkstars. Come early 1998, the artist was involved with two new series: Star Trek: Untold Voyages (aborted after just five issues) and Babylon 5: In Valen’s Name, a three-parter on which he collaborated with J Michael Straczynski, creator of the television series. While much of his focus since the millennium has been outside the comics field, Collins – who has recently produced storyboards for BBC-TV’s Doctor Who series – continues to contribute to Doctor Who and 2000 AD as well as to its companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.
  22. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - Laurence Campbell Appearing: Sat/Sun Artist: B.P.R.D.: Hell on Earth; 2000 AD; ​FOR THE past two years Laurence Campbell has been immersed in the Hellverse where he has been drawing stories and/or covers for B.P.R.D.: Hell on Earth as well as illustrating 2013's Sledgehammer 44: Lightning War three-parter. The artist began his career 18 years before he became involved in the universe created Mike Mignola as a setting for Hellboy and the other elements of the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Development making his debut with a four-page contribution to issue #19 of Caliber's Negative Burn anthology. He continued to work sporadically for Caliber following that 1995 strip – most notably on the four issues of 1997's The Red Diaries – until 2000 when he embarked on a lengthy association with 2000 AD . For the next five years he contributed semi-regularly to the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic and occasionally to its spin-off title, Judge Dredd Megazine. Then, after illustrating 2007's Wolverine #49 for Marvel, Campbell – who also pencilled the single 2001 issue of Image's Disciples: Wheel of Fortune – was hired by the House of Ideas to pencil a five-issue run on The Punisher​. This was followed by a handful of Punisher one-shots, Moon Knight: Silent Knight (another one-off) and 2010's four-issue Deadpool: Pulp before the artist took on his most high profile to date. In 2011 he illustrated the Marvel Universe vs Wolverine four-parter and followed it up with 2012's The Gunslinger: The Way Station – Marvel's latest five-issue series continuing its adaptation of Stephen King's Dark Tower saga – before migrating to Dark Horse and Mignola's Hellverse in 2013. http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120228011649/marveldatabase/images/thumb/a/a2/Dark_Tower_The_Gunslinger_-_The_Way_Station_Vol_1_5_Textless.jpg/517px-Dark_Tower_The_Gunslinger_-_The_Way_Station_Vol_1_5_Textless.jpg
  23. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - David Roach Appearing: Sat/Sun Artist: 2000 AD; Batman/Demon WELL known for his encyclopaedic knowledge of comics history and for his remarkable ability to identify the work of other comics artists, David Roach began his professional career drawing for 2000 AD. He worked on various strips for the self-styled Galaxy’s Greatest Comic between 1988 and 1992, when he made his US debut illustrating a 13-page story for issue #3 of Marvel’s creator-owned Epic anthology. Over the next three years he pencilled for both DC and Dark Horse contributing to such titles as Dark Horse Comics, Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi – Knights of the Old Republic, Darkstars and Lobo before drawing 1996’s Batman/Demon one-shot. Much in demand as an inker especially on Doctor Who Magazine, Roach’s next major project was Star Trek: Voyager – Avalon Rising, a 2000 one-shot for DC’s WildStorm imprint following which he renewed his association with 2000 AD. He remains a frequent contributor to the UK SF weekly while also working outside of comics; among other things he provides illustrations for role-playing game manuals and storyboards for films. The co-author of 2014's The Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years for Dynamite, he also occasionally contributes to 2000 AD's companion title, Judge Dredd Megazine.
  24. Latest Guest Announcement - Steve Yeowell Attending: Saturday Artist: Zenith; 2000 AD; Skrull Kill Krew MUCH admired for his collaboration on Zenith, 2000 AD's mould-breaking superhero saga with Grant Morrison, artist Steve Yeowell first came in contact with the acclaimed Scots writer virtually at the start of his career. Mere months after making his debut at Harrier Comics in 1986 (on Swiftsure & Conqueror), Yeowell moved to Marvel UK where he teamed up with Morrison for a 10-issue run on Spider-Man and Zoids which the artist followed with a handful of issues of Thundercats and Action Force (the British version of G.I. Joe). Then Morrison handpicked him for Zenith, which he drew from 1987 to 1992. In parallel he illustrated other stories for 2000 AD, with which he has remained continuously associated ever since. Yeowell's first US work was a contribution to the 1989 first issue of Open Space, Marvel's SF anthology, with the 67 Seconds graphic novel for the House of Ideas' creator-owned imprint following in 1992. Sandwiched in between was the Morrison-written The New Adventures of Hitler. That ran in Crisis, 2000 AD's politically aware companion title, just months before Yeowell began his 14 years (and counting) association with Judge Dredd Megazine, the prime spin-off from 2000 AD. Two years later he reunited with Morrison for the three-issue Sebastian O for Vertigo's DC's embryonic mature readers imprint for which he also illustrated the first four issues of 1994's Morrison-scripted The Invisibles​. The following year came Skrull Kill Krew, a Marvel five-parter co-authored by Morrison and fellow Scot Mark Millar, with whom the artist had also worked at 2000 AD. Since then Yeowell has been a virtually permanent contributor to the weekly SF anthology and/or the Megazine although he has found time for sporadic returns to the US audience. Primarily his output has been fill-ins, annuals and the like but he did also draw a 2002 Foot Soldiers graphic novel for AiT/Planet Lar and couple more short runs on The Invisibles. http://www.bleedingcool.com/wp-content/uploads//2010/11/22.jpg
  25. Latest Comic Guest Announcement - John Wagner Attending: Sat/Sun Writer: 2000 AD; A History of Violence LAUDED as the co-creator of Judge Dredd and as a founding father of 2000 AD, where the Lawman of the Future made his debut in the 1977 second issue of the self-styled Galaxy's Greatest Comic. John Wagner's career dates back to some 10 years earlier. Born in the USA but brought up in Scotland from the age of 12, Wagner began writing for Dundee-based DC Thomson in the 1960s eventually rising to become chief sub-editor of Romeo. It was while working on the UK comics behemoth's girls' weekly that he first encountered Pat Mills, who would subsequently have a significant influence on his career. Leaving DCT to go freelance, Wagner and Mills collaborated on stories for a variety of titles for IPC (the other major British comics publisher). Their output covered humour and both girls' and boys' weeklies before Wagner headed to London in 1973 to edit girls' titles for IPC. That lasted for less than a year after which Wagner quit comics until late '74 when Mills lured him back to help set up Battle Picture Weekly. With that IPC title, which launched in 1975, Mills and Wagner began changing the face of British comics, modernising that which had become stagnant and very traditional in their approach. It was a groundbreaking makeover that the duo continued and escalated when Mills was asked to create a new SF comic and invited Wagner to join him in the endeavour. Premiering in 1977, 2000 AD was an immediate and huge success and remains at the peak of British comics publishing scene today, almost 40 years after its first publication. Over the years, aside from Judge Dredd, Wagner – who also wrote for Doctor Who Magazine in 1979-80 – also co-created such heroes as Robo-Hunter and the Button Man for the SF weekly. Among his other co-creations are Strontium Dog (first seen in 1978 in Starlord, 2000 AD's short-lived sister title) as well as Ace Trucking Co for 2000 AD, Eagle's Doomlord and Manix, The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!, Invasion 1984 for Battle and Dan Harker's War for Roy of the Rovers, all in collaboration with his long-term writing partner Alan Grant. In addition, a 1982-83 reunion with Mills saw him writing Dan Dare for for the relaunched Eagle. Four years later and in tandem with Grant, Wagner – who has contributed to 2000 AD virtually continuously for the past 38 years and to its sister title, Judge Dredd Megazine since 1990 – made his US debut. The writing duo scripted the 12 issues of 1987's Outcasts for DC following which they co-authored nine 1988 Batman stories in Detective Comics, The Bogie Man​ – a 1990 Fat Man Press four-parter – and its various sequels as well as on the first 10 issues of Marvel UK's Strip and The Last American, a 1990 four-parter for Epic, Marvel's creator-owned imprint. Although that was pretty much the end of their joint American venture, Wagner and Grant did reunite from time to time, most notably on a quartet of high profile Batman/Judge Dredd one-shots. These DC/2000 AD crossovers began in 1991 with the hugely successful Judgement on Gotham but were published sporadically until 1998 with 1995's Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Bikers vs the Mutants from Hell inserted along the way. The pair also wrote 1991's The Punisher: Blood on the Moors graphic novel for Marvel while Wagner went on to write the following year's The Punisher: Die Hard in the Big Easy – and the 12 issues of DC's Chain Gang War that followed it in 1994 – on his own. Increasingly disenchanted with the manner in which American comics were produced and much preferring the British approach, Wagner all-but cut his ties with US publishers in 2000. Before he withdrew, however, he scripted a swathe of titles, among them Aliens: Berserker (1995), Star Wars: Boba Fett (1995), Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire (1996) and Predator vs Judge Dredd (1997) for Dark Horse, a couple of 1996 spin-offs from The Crow for Kitchen Sink and A History of Violence graphic novel the following year for Paradox Graphic Mystery (a DC imprint) before winding up at Topps on Xena, Warrior Princess (1999). Since then Wagner's output has been almost exclusively for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine. He did make a brief return to the US market in 1993 for Judge Dredd vs Aliens: Incubus (co-authored with former 2000 AD editor Andy Diggle) and a brief run on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight for DC but it is primarily for his half-a-century of writing for British titles that Wagner is considered one of the UK's most respected comics creators. Down the years his writing has inspired many who have followed in his footsteps. He continues to be an inspiration to many. http://www.forbiddenplanet.co.uk/blog/wp2013/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Predator-Versus-Judge-Dredd-Versus-Aliens-05.jpg​
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